History

Our curriculum intent: why we teach what we teach in History

  • Students will learn a coherent and chronological understanding of the past which will enable them to understand and appreciate their own local identity and heritage as well as national and international developments through time that have shaped the world in which they live.

  • Students will be able to analyse and interrogate the accuracy and reliability of sources, and, through this, and the acquisition and application of knowledge as an expert, be skilled at discerning what is true and what is not; this will allow students to form articulate and evidence based opinions to confidently thrive in the 21st Century.

  • Students will become starkly aware of how the past continues to shape the future, as well as a deep understanding of how individuals and events have changed the course of history for better and for worse, and the moral implications of this. We want students to yearn for truth and justice, to reject falsehood and injustice, and be inspired by those in history who have done the former, to do the same in their own lives.

History curriculum intent

Curriculum

Year 7

Year 7

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Unit Title

The Romans

The Anglo-Saxons and Vikings

The Norman Conquest

Key Question

How did the Romans build their empire?

How significant was Anglo-Saxon England in the development of an English identity?

Was the Norman Conquest more change than continuity?

Threshold Concepts

The Roman empire was successful due to its organisation and military prowess.

Roman Britain is the first time period for which we have written sources. Britain was part of the Roman empire from 43AD-410AD. This led to a migration of peoples from across the empire to Britain, new trade connections and the development of early towns. There is debate amongst historians regarding the extent that these economic and social developments survived in Britain after the Romans left.

Hadrian’s wall in the north of England is a lasting reminder of Roman occupation.

The Anglo-Saxon migrations to Britain started in the 5th Century AD and resulted in the formation of 7 early kingdoms in England.

A number of the elements of English identity which have survived for hundreds of years were formed during this period. In particular, the use of the English language, the widespread adoption of Christianity and the practice of written laws and government.

The Vikings invasions which plagued England from the eighth centuries onwards led to the unification of the different Anglo-Saxon kingdoms under one royal house. Our current monarchy can trace their roots back to House of Wessex.

English identity emerged during this period as a result of contact with the Vikings.

The Norman Conquest of 1066 was a significant turning point in British History. Many of the modern institutions still evident in Britain today were formed during this time.

Historical scholarship on the period is focused on the extent to which 1066-1135 was a time of change or continuity. It led to the removal of much of the governing class at the time, the mass migration of Normans into Britain but for the majority of the population life continued as normal.

The feudal system introduced by the Normans impacted life in England for the next century and in many ways was not fully removed until after First World War. 

Link to Prior Knowledge

 

This unit explores the extent to which the Anglo-Saxons continued the work of the Romans in the economic, social and political development of Britain. This fits into the overarching theme that much of the progress made in Medieval Britain was the result of external influences.

This unit draws on the knowledge of Britain’s development so far to judge the extent to which the Norman King’s changed religious, town and village life in England.
Norman England was not part of an Empire, but some comparison can be made between the ways in which the Romans, the Anglo-Saxons and the Normans adopted similar strategies to govern the country. We will return to a case study of the north of England to explore similarities. 

 

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Medieval Religion

The Crusades

The Reformation

Key Question

Who held the power in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, the church or the state?

How and why did the Crusades happen?

How much did religion in England change during the sixteenth century?

Threshold Concepts

The eleventh century saw the rise of the reform papacy, an effort on behalf of the papacy to remove secular influences from the church. This led to many struggles between the Christian Kings of Europe and the Popes. 

Durham Cathedral is an excellent case study of the political power that could be yielded by the church and how this was used by the Norman Kings to further their control.

The feud between King Henry II and his archbishop Thomas Becket is a clear case study of the difficulties Medieval Kings faced when trying to impose their will over the church. 

 

The Crusades were a series of medieval military expeditions made by Europeans to recover the Holy Land from the Muslims in the eleventh, twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

The First Crusade was called by Pope Urban II in response to the changing situation in Europe and in the Near East in the eleventh century.

The success of the First Crusade led to the establishment of the Crusader States of Outremer and nearly 200 years of co-habitation and conflict between the Christians and Muslims living in the Near East.

 

 

Due to the ideas circulating in the Renaissance period, the autonomy and status of the Roman Catholic Church had begun to be questioned by the sixteenth century. Martin Luther was one of the prominent critics of the Catholic Church.

In 1534, Henry VIII made himself the Head of the Church of England and broke with Rome. He introduced the concept of Royal Supremacy. This led to huge religious and political upheaval in England for decades.

The reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I all brought different elements to the church in England from the beginnings of Protestantism, the counter-reformation and the ‘middle way’.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit builds upon the knowledge of how Christianity came to Britain and its development over time.

The religious changes brought to England by the Normans fit into the wider topic of the extent to which these changes were motivated by a desire to get more control over the land rather a genuine religious devotion. This is a common theme which will be revisited in the Reformation unit when studying the concept of Royal Supremacy.

This unit builds up the aims of the reform papacy which were introduced in the previous topic. As many historians would argue the main purpose of the crusade was to bolster the reputation of the papacy.

The unit also delves deeper into the mind set and culture of the population of Medieval Europe. In particular, this unit focuses on the knights and the extent to which they were motivated by religious devotion.

This unit draws together the various concepts which have been threaded through the curriculum. Firstly the development of church in Europe from the time of the Roman Empire onwards. This aids the understanding of the position of the papacy by the sixteenth century.
Secondly, the students use their knowledge of church-state conflict in the eleventh and twelfth centuries to understand Henry VIII and his children’s motives for their religious policy.

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

This study will give students an understanding of how Britain developed during the Medieval period. The enquiry question for this year concerns power in medieval society and the extent to which this was held by either the King, the church or the people. Each unit provides for the students an overview of how religion developed over time and a case study of the conflict between church and state. In addition, an overarching theme of this year is about the development of English and British identity that has been formed over time.  Our intent is to show the students that since Medieval times, Britain has been a part of, influenced by and connected to the wider world, and not at the centre of it.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 0 History department curriculum, please click here.

Year 8

Year 8

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Unit Title

King John, The Magna Carta and the Peasants’ Revolt

The Growth and Power of Parliament

The Impact of the Atlantic Slave Trade

Key Question

How did the Magna Carta change the role of royal authority in England?

What were the key causes and consequences of the English Civil War?

What was the Atlantic slave trade and what was its impact on slaves?

Threshold Concepts

Royal Authority was transformed in England during the reign of King John by his failures as king and the Magna Carta. This, among other causes, created the climate for the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381.

 

The Magna Carta is regarded as the first step in Britain’s long journey to democracy. 

There were multiple causes of the English Civil War, including conflict between Charles and Parliament over religious and economic reforms. The consequences of the Civil War, including the 1689 Bill of Rights were far reaching.

The Atlantic Slave Trade describes the movement of slaves from central and west Africa to the Americas in exchange for goods.

‘The middle passage’ describes the transportation of the slaves from Africa to the Americas. The conditions were horrific and dehumanising, as was life on the plantations.

Awareness of these conditions grew in Britain leading to the abolitionist movement.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit builds up on the knowledge of Henry II and Richard I’s reigns which was explored in the year 7 units on medieval religion and the crusades.

This unit also builds up on the political developments of the monarchy in England throughout the Medieval period to assess the success of King John against a criterion for good kingship in the twelfth century.

This unit builds upon two common themes in the key stage 3 curriculum. Firstly, this unit revisits the student’s knowledge of medieval kingship in Anglo-Saxon, Norman, Angevin and Tudor England. The doctrine of ‘the Divine Right of Kings’ written by King James I and adopted by his son Charles I was the extension of Henry VIII’s belief in the Royal Supremacy.  This links to the overarching enquiry question on the growth of democracy by studying the long term impact of the Magna Carta.

Secondly, this unit revisits the divisions caused by the Reformation and the problems it poised for the Stuart monarchy.

 

 

In the previous units on the Roman Empire and the Crusades, the History of Africa has been touched upon but only in relation to trade. This unit will build on this knowledge to enable the students to understand the political, social and economic life in Africa before the slave and the devastating effects this had upon the country and its people.

This links to the overarching enquiry question on the growth of democracy by studying the extent to which working-class people became more politically active through the abolition movement in Britain.

 

 

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

The Development of Civil Rights in the USA

The campaign for Male suffrage.

The campaign for Women’s suffrage.

Key Question

Why and how did black Americans fight for civil rights?

Why and how did the working class campaign for equality in the voting system?

Why and how did women campaign for equality in the voting system?

Threshold Concepts

Slavery in the United States was abolished in the mid-19th Century yet a racist system of segregation remained.

 

In the mid-20th century a civil rights movement developed, led by black Americans. This movement successfully campaigned to end segregation and discrimination in voting rights.

The Industrial Revolution led to the growth of industrial cities and the increased awareness of the need for social reform.

 

The working classes campaigned for the vote throughout the 19th Century. The Chartist movement was key to this campaign.

 

The Reform Acts of 1832, 1867 and 1884-85 increased the voting rights of men in England.

Edwardian Britain was a place of significant social inequality.

 

Women still not have the vote. This led to the Suffragist and Suffragette movements.

 

Women’s suffrage was achieved after the campaigns of these two groups. There were external factors to the success of the campaigns including the impact of women’s contribution to the First World War.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit builds upon the study of the abolition in 1807, 1833 and 1879 to show the extent to which racial prejudice survived and life did not dramatically improve for many African Americans.

This unit also builds up the concept that individuals and mass movements can be significant in the outcome of historical events. This was explored through the peasants’ revolt and the abolition of the slave trade.

This unit revisits the growth of parliamentary democracy in Britain. This allows for the students to apply their knowledge about the situation after the Glorious Revolution and compare it to voting laws in the 1800s.

The use of protests both violent and non-violent also builds upon the concept that the lower-classes can have agency in historical events which was also explored in the peasants’ revolt, the abolition movement and the Civil Rights movement.

This unit draws together the various concepts which have been threaded through the curriculum. Firstly it revisits the growth of democracy using the knowledge gained about the diminishing of royal power, the growth of parliamentary sovereignty and finally the suffrage of the working-classes and women.

Secondly, this unit revisits the role of the lower classes. By this point the key stage 3 curriculum has charted Britain’s growth from an out-post of the Roman Empire, to a stable country into a world power by the twentieth century. This narrative aims to step away from the ‘Great Men’ in History route and to represent the roles of the lower classes, women and minority groups in Britain’s development over time.   

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

This thematic study will enable students to gain an understanding of the development of the relationship between the citizen and the state.  It considers the causes, scale, nature and consequences of protest to that relationship. By charting the journey from feudalism and serfdom to democracy and equality, it reveals how, in different periods, the state responds to challenges to its authority and their impact. It allows students to construct an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of the citizen.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 0 History department curriculum, please click here.

Year 9

Year 9

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Unit Title

The First World War

The interwar years

Significant Events in the Second World War

Key Question

Why did Europe go to war in 1914?

Why did Europe go to war in 1939?

What was Britain’s involvement in the key events of the Second World War?

Threshold Concepts

There were several long terms causes of the First World War, including militarism, imperialism, nationalism and the system of alliances.

There were short term causes of the First World War, including the blank cheque and the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

The experience of soldiers in the First World War was unique in history and the consequence of stalemate on the Western Front.

The Battle of the Somme was a key event in the First World War. Historians have debated who was to blame for the horrendous loss of life.

The Treaty of Versailles failed to establish the conditions for a lasting peace in Europe and created political instability.

This led to the failure of the Weimar Republic and the rise of Hitler in Germany.

The League of Nations failed to act effectively in the 1930s and Hitler took advantage of their apparent weakness.

Hitler’s foreign policy aims led to the reoccupation of the Rhineland (1936), the reunification of Austria and Germany (1938) and the Sudetenland crisis (1938).

Britain followed a policy of appeasement throughout the 1930s.

The German army applied ‘Blitzkrieg’ tactics, leading to successes throughout 1939-40 and the evacuation of British troops from Dunkirk.

Key battles of the Second World War include the battle of Britain, the battle of the Atlantic and D-Day. D-Day represents the turning point that led, eventually to German defeat.

The ‘Home Front’ is the term used to describe life in Britain through the Second World War.

The USA became involved in the war after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbour. The conflict in the Pacific was ended by the dropping of the Atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

Link to Prior Knowledge

The unit revisits the knowledge regarding the social and political situation in nineteenth century Britain and makes clear its relation to the rest of Europe. In particular, the extent to which the industrial revolution and the growth of the empire made Britain a world power. This led to competition between the European countries and a rise in nationalism, imperialism and militarism which contributed to the outbreak of war.

 

This unit revisits the student’s understanding of political ideologies. The concept of democracy is explored throughout in the year 8 curriculum, to enable the students to understand the concepts of dictatorship, communism and fascism. These competing ideologies emerged in post-war Europe and dominated international politics.

 

This unit contrasts the style of warfare used between 1914-1918 and 1939-1945. In order to emphasize the extent to which the Second World War was a ‘People’s war’ and the impact this had on Post-War Europe. 

 

 

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

The Holocaust

GCSE Germany

GCSE Germany

Key Question

What was the Holocaust and why is it significant today?

Why was the Kaiser forced to abdicate?

Why did the Nazis win the election in 1933? 

Threshold Concepts

The risk of the Nazi party in Germany in the 20th Century led to an increase in anti-Semitism.

The Nazi party carried out a campaign of persecution against Jews in 1930s Germany including the Nuremburg Laws, the creation of ‘Ghettos’ and Kristallnacht.

The ‘Final Solution’ was the term used to describe the Nazi’s efforts to destroy Europe’s Jewish population.

The Holocaust is remembered annually on Holocaust Memorial Day and at key monuments and museums around the word.

Germany during the Reign of Kaiser Wilhelm II experienced significant political and social upheaval including the rise of industrialisation, growth of socialism and demands for democracy.

The Weimar Republic was established as a response to the political crisis in Germany created by the end of the First World War. Key principles of the Republic were proportional representation and coalition government.

There was significant political unrest throughout the Weimar period, including the Spartacists uprising, the Kapp Putsch and the Munich Putsch.

 

The Weimar Republic was revived under Stresemann, leading to the entry of Germany into the League of Nations and significant cultural and social developments. The global economic depression stimulated the growth of extreme politics in Europe, including the National Socialist Party in Germany.

The Nazi party gained 230 seats in 1932, exposing the issues with coalition government. Hitler was appointed chancellor in 1933 and established himself as dictator in 1934.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit builds upon similar themes introduced in the slave trade topic regarding the atrocities humans have committed in the past to other humans, the racial prejudices at the foundation of this and the ways in which we continue to commemorate and struggle with the negative aspects of the past.

This unit also aims to place the Holocaust in the historical context of Nazi Germany taught in the previous two units. This will address the misconception that Hitler alone was responsible for the Holocaust and ensure the students grapple with debate regarding perpetrators, bystanders and victims.

This unit is the start of the GCSE and there are various strands of the Key Stage 3 curriculum which have been sequenced to aid a deeper understanding.

The development of Britain into a world power in the nineteenth century provides a case study in which to compare and understand the changes in Germany 1890-1918. In particular, the growth of nationalism, militarism and imperialism.

The development of political ideologies is revisited when we study the growth of socialism and the demands for democracy.  It also helps the students understand the range of political threats the Weimar government faced from the Right and the Left from 1919-1933.

This unit revisits the knowledge regarding the Nazi rise to power but will focus in greater detail upon the various strands of Nazi ideology from 1924-1933 and its appeal to the different social groups in Germany.

Through an in-depth study of Hitler’s actions from 1933-1934, we revisit the principles of democracy to fully understand how Hitler was able to change the system in Germany into a Fascist dictatorship.

Finally, the unit builds upon the concept of communism and the threat Western leaders saw from this. This was touched upon in the earlier study of appeasement but will provide further context for the Cold War unit which follows.

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

This course enables students to understand the complex and diverse interests of the countries and how that leads to tension and conflict. It focuses on the causes, nature of how and why conflicts occurred.  This course also considers the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change and how they were affected by and influenced international relations.  It also looks at the nature of conflict in the twentieth century.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 0 History department curriculum, please click here.

Year 10

Year 10

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Unit Title

The impact of the Nazi Dictatorship on the people of Germany.

The Origins and development of the Cold War

The Transformation of the Cold War

Key Question

How were the Germans affected by Nazi control of Germany?

How did the Cold War develop after the Second World War?

How did the Cold War develop from 1960-1975?

Threshold Concepts

The Nazi government controlled the population by the use of propaganda and terror.

 

The Nazi government stimulated the economy through rearmament and large scale building projects like the autobahns.

 

Nazi policy had a significant impact on the role of women in German society and the indoctrination of the young through the education system.

 

The racial policies of the Nazi government created the climate whereby the Jews could be systematically persecuted, leading to the events of the Holocaust.

The Yalta Conference divides Germany and Berlin into zones of occupation. The Potsdam Conference demonstrates the conflicting views of the Allies over the future of Eastern Europe.

Soviet expansion in the late 1940s led to Churchill declaring that an ‘Iron Curtain’ had fallen over Europe. This led to the Truman Doctrine and the development of the Marshall Plan as a counter-measure from the United States.

The Communist revolution in China led to American concerns regarding a ‘domino effect’ in Asia. This, and other factors, led to the wars in Korea and Vietnam.

The U.S.A. and Russia were engaged in an arms race throughout the Cold War, exemplified in the ‘Space Race’ and the development of advanced nuclear weaponry. NATO and the Warsaw Pact were formed in this time.

Khrushchev’s rise in the USSR led to a ‘thawing’ in the Cold War. However, events in Hungary and the capturing of Gary Powers and the U2 crisis led to a hardening of relationships between the two powers.

The Berlin Wall was constructed in 1961. President Kennedy framed the Wall as a symbol of protest and freedom.

 

Tensions in Cuba led to the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 and the establishing of the ‘hotline’ between Washington and Moscow.

 

Détente is the term used to describe the easing of tensions between the East and West in the 1970s. The SALT talks led agreements regarding reducing armaments on both sides.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit draws on the knowledge regarding life in the Kaiser’s Germany and during the Weimar period in order to understand the motives of Nazi policy.

It also revisits the Holocaust and the incomprehensible treatment inflicted on minority groups as a result of Nazi policy from 1933-1945.

This unit revisits the development of political ideologies after the war. Students use their knowledge of Russian’s withdrawal from the Entente alliance, the policy of appeasement and the Nazi Soviet Pact to understand tensions between East and West after the Second World War.

This unit revisits the students understanding of how wars were fought in the first half of the twentieth century to understand the changing nature of conflict after the development of nuclear weapons.

 

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Conquered and the conquerors

Looking West

Expansion and Empire

Key Question

How and why did England become a nation?

How and why did England create the American colonies?

How and why did Britain become an imperial power?

Threshold Concepts

The GCSE Migration, Empire and the People’s unit covers one thousand years of History with aim of answering three big questions:
1)How did the British empire grow and decline?

2) What has motivated migration and how does this differ for each group and time period?

3)How was English (and later British) identity formed? 

The Vikings invaded England was motivated by the desire to gain a better quality of land than that available in Scandinavia.

Alfred the Great created an education system, English laws, built burghs and formed a navy to defend England’s shores.

The Hundred Years War led to the formation of the concept of England as a nation and France as a European power.

The slave trade developed as a means of increasing the sale of cotton and tobacco.

The Atlantic slave trade led to the expansion of British ports and millions of pounds of profit for Britain.

The religious persecution of the Puritans and Quakers during the English Civil war pushed these groups towards colonising the Americas.

The first colonists to the Americas led to the depopulation of the Native Americans through disease and persecution.

Britain’s loss of the American War of Independence led to the creation of Canadian self-government and the expansion of the British Empire in the East, including India and Australia.

The British Empire initially developed its influence in India through trade and the work of the East India Company.

Robert Clive and others led military campaigns in India which saw the creation of the ‘East India Protectorate’.

Britain’s rule of India had a significant social, political, cultural and economic impact.

Britain’s Empire expanded in Africa through trade and the ‘scramble for Africa’ stimulated by the imperial rivalry in Europe.

Several significant people groups migrated to England throughout the 19th Century, including the Irish in response to the Potato Famine and the Jewish community, in response to the pogroms in Russia.

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit revisits a number of topics from Year 7 and 8. In particular, it charts the growth of Britain as a medieval power. It builds upon the students’ understanding of Britain as a country, then a kingdom and later as part of an Empire. 

This unit revisits the students’ knowledge regarding the religious disputes in Britain from 1534 to the Civil War period to contextualise why different
groups migrated to and from Britain.

This unit revisits the political motivations of British monarchs in the Early Modern period regarding their empire. By understanding the situation in Britain from Elizabethan times onwards, the students gain a fuller understanding of the need to colonise land in America and the British involve in the slave trade.

This unit returns to Britain in the nineteenth century and its emergence as a world power. Previous units have focused on the social, political and economic changes within Britain and the country’s relationship with other European powers. This provides context for motivating factors which led to migration to and from Britain in this time.

This unit also builds upon the recurring theme of Imperialism and the positive and negative aspects of this controversial concept.

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

 

AQA Germany 1890-1945 Democracy and Dictatorship

Part 3- the experience of Germans under the Nazi

The overarching question for this unit is how did life change under the Nazis? By studying the impact Nazi policy had on the economy, the lives of women, children and minority groups in Germany. This finishes with an understanding of the Nazis use of terror and the Final Solution.

 

AQA Conflict and Tension between East and West 1945-1972

Part 1 and Part 2- The origins and development of the Cold War  This unit follows in terms of chronology from the Germany unit and studies the impact the end of the Second World War had on international relations. The study covers the start of the cold war, the tensions over post-war Europe, the proxy wars in Asia and the thaw in tensions during the Khrushchev era.

 

AQA Conflict and Tension between East and West 1945-1972

Part 3- The transformation of the Cold War

This study charts the intensification of the cold war in the 1960s, with tensions reaching a high point in the Cuban Missile Crisis. It also analyses the extent to which Détente was reached by 1972.

 

AQA Migration, Empire and the Peoples

Part 1-Conquered and the Conquerors   This study returns to Anglo-Saxon England to review the different migrant groups who moved to and contributed to life in England. It also studies the start of early medieval empires such as the Norman Kingdom and Angevin Empire.

 

AQA Migration, Empire and the Peoples

Part 2- Looking West     

This unit looks at the changes which took place as a result of new technology during the age of exploration. It covers the development, growth and eventual independence of the American colonies and the different migrant groups who moved to and from Britain during the Early Modern period.

 

AQA Migration, Empire and the Peoples

Part 3- Expansion and Empire    

This unit covers the rapid expansion of the British Empire in the nineteenth century by looking at the case studies of India and Africa.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 0 History department curriculum, please click here.

Year 11

Year 11

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Unit Title

Britain in the Twentieth Century

Causes of the Norman Conquest 

Life in Norman England

Key Question

How and why did Britain’s relationship with the Empire change?

How did the Normans establish their control over England?

How did life in England change as a result of the Conquest?

Threshold Concepts

The British Empire ended as a result of the impact of the first and second world wards and the growth of nationalism and independence movements within the colonies.

 

There are several legacies of Empire, including the ‘Windrush’ generation of Caribbean migrants.

 

The Falklands War tested Britain’s relationship with states within the Commonwealth and contributed to the re-election of Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister.

 

 

The Norman Conquest took place as a result of the conflict over who should inherit the English throne in 1066.

 

The Conquest came in the aftermath of conflict between three of the four notable claimants. Historians debate the most significant cause of William of Normandy’s victory at Hastings in 1066.

William of Normandy asserted his authority as king through a combination of terror and compromise.

 

The rebellions of William’s reign led to the use of castles and the feudal system to assert greater control over the population. William also planned effectively for his succession.

The Normans made significant changes to the legal systems of England, moving towards primogeniture and a legal system based on fines rather than brutal punishment. French became the administrative language.

Peasants faced significant challenges in their daily lives. Norman villages were hierarchical; the bailiff, reeve, priest and miller were all significant.

The Normans enhanced the status of some towns, such as London and Norwich, at the expense of others which had been key Anglo-Saxon towns previously. Trade with Norman territories was prioritised.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit builds upon the narrative started in the Key stage 3 curriculum regarding Britain’s decline as a world power in the second half of the twentieth century.

In our aim for a representative curriculum we hope to have addressed the misconception that black people did not to Britain migrate till 1948. The study of post-war migration is treated as the next chapter in the on-going narrative regarding the contributions of different ethnic groups to Britain’s development rather than seeing 1948 as a start point.

The Norman GCSE unit revisits a number of the key themes explored in the year 7 curriculum regarding life in Medieval Britain.

Firstly, it revisits the knowledge of Anglo-Saxon England and the Viking invasions to understand the nature of English kingship at this time and the predicament England was left in by Edward the Confessor’s death.

Secondly, it also revisits a number of political elements of conquest such as the use of castles, how the crown dealt with rebellions and feudal system. These concepts were recurring in the year 7 curriculum.

 

This unit revisits the social and economic changes taught during the year 7 curriculum in more detail. In particular, the focus on William’s motivations for the balance he struck between change and continuity.

 

 

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Religious change and historic environment

Revision and exams

Key Question

How did the Normans change religious life in England?

Threshold Concepts

Norman rule saw changes in the architecture of churches to the ‘Romanesque’ style and the division of diocese’ into archdeaconries and deaneries.

Key figures in the Roman church, including Anselm of Canterbury and Pope Gregory VII had a significant impact on life in Norman England.

Norman cathedrals performed a religious and political purpose. They provided a centre for religious observance but also an imposing physical reminder Norman control.

The Benedictine order of monks made four vows; poverty, chastity, obedience and stability.

Monasteries played a key role in the education provided in England. Norman knights prioritised the education of their young and this led to a growing education system.

 

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit provides the students with an in-depth study of the practical ways in which kings changed religious practice to fit their own political needs. This builds upon the different concepts of papacy, reform and secular control taught in the year 7 and 8 curriculum.

 

 

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

 

AQA Migration, Empire and the Peoples

Part 4- Britain in the Twentieth century                  This unit covers the decline and end of the British Empire in the Twentieth century. Students look at the range of factors which contributed to this fall including the rise of nationalism, economic problems in Britain and the impact of the wars.

 

AQA Norman England 1066-1135

Part 1- Causes of the Norman Conquest. This unit covers the context to England in 1066 to understand the reasons why there was a succession crisis after the death of Edward. This then moves onto understanding how the Norman Conquest happened.

 

AQA Norman England 1066-1135

Part 2- Life in Norman England. This unit focuses around the changes which took place in Norman England for the aristocracy and the peasants to assess the extent to which the Norman Conquest was a period of change and continuity.

 

AQA Norman England 1066-1135

Part 3- Religion changes. This unit focuses on the religious changes brought to England by the Norman Kings and the extent to which these reforms were politically or religiously motivated.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 0 History department curriculum, please click here.

Sixth Form

History Staff