Technology

Our curriculum intent: why we teach what we teach in Technology

  • Students will learn to build up and apply a technical knowledge and understanding to deal with tomorrows rapidly changing world. We want to encourage students to become independent, creative and innovative problem solvers and thinkers, either as individuals or as part of a team. We want to enable them to identify needs and opportunities and to respond to them by developing ideas and prototypes that will help to solve real and relevant problems.
  • Students will be able to combine graphical and practical skills with an understanding of aesthetic, social and environmental issues, as well as functions and industry. We want them to be able to reflect on and evaluate past and present technology, it’s uses and impacts. Wherever possible to link their work to other disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art.
  • Students will become young people who actively contribute to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of themselves, their community and their nation. We want them to take risks and so become more resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable. To develop a critical understanding of the impact that technology and engineering has on their daily lives and the wider world.

Technology curriculum intent

Curriculum

Year 7

Electronics and Systems

Year 7

 

Unit Title

Steady Hand Game project

 

Key Question

Why is it important to study and understand how, why and where electronic components,  circuits and systems are part of almost every aspect of modern life?

Threshold Concepts

Students will understand how to work safely when soldering, they will begin to understand about voltage, resistance and current. They will use CAD software and understand how to incorporate a switch into a circuit. Students will use evaluation and assessment to assess their final product, suggesting recommendations for future work.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will recognise that they have used electronic equipment from a very early age and will be helped to identify the systems involved and varying levels of complexity.

Resistant materials

Year 7

 

Unit Title

Introduction to how Resistant Materials (manmade and natural) have shaped the world. This is delivered through the manufacture of a Key Fob, Acrylic Twister and a Puzzle Box

Key Question

What is the difference between man-made and naturally occurring materials?

How much do we depend on man-made materials? Is this true of all countries?

Threshold Concepts

Students will know how to behave and perform given tasks safely in a craft workshop environment. Students will be familiar with the design process and its importance in the manufacture of all products. They will be able to demonstrate a range of practical skills using machines and tools effectively.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will have differing experiences but should be familiar with how and why products are made from different materials and in different countries.

Food

Year 7

 

Unit Title

Introduction to Food Nutrition

Key Question

How does a reduction sauce thicken?

How can I produce food products in a safe manner?

What effect does marination have on a protein?

How does conduction, convection and radiation work to cook food?

Threshold Concepts

Students will understand ‘Health in Safety in the food room’, along with the basic principles of how to cook food in a hygienically safe manner. They will use the oven, hob and grill within their four practical activities, along with beginning to understand the three different cooking methods of conduction, convection and radiation.

Students will be introduced to a reduction sauce, along with understanding that water leaves the sauce to achieve the thickened consistency. Another practical will see students marinating a protein, introducing them to the effects that a marination has on the chemical bonds within a protein.

 

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will come to Emmanuel with varying levels of experience in the Food room. It is hoped that this introduction will allow them to be given a solid grounding, for progressing further with the subject in Year 8.

Core Technology

Year 7

 

Unit Title

Introduction to graphic techniques

Key Question

How do we use graphic techniques to enhance our drawings?

Threshold Concepts

Students will learn a range of graphics techniques, including lettering styles, back plates and rendering techniques. A range drawing skills including isometric are introduced to help students present their work. Students are also introduced to CADCAM to manufacture quality products.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will have an understanding of sketching, drawing and the use of colour from primary school.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 0 Technology department curriculum, please click here.

Year 8

Year 8

 

Unit Title

Moisture Sensor

Key Question

What are electronic sensing systems and how can they be adapted to control a variety of output devices, including relays, motors, buzzers, solenoids and lights.

Threshold Concepts

Students will begin to calculate voltage, current and resistance using ohms’ law, learning how to design using a systems type approach and they are being introduced to a transistor, which is a very important component in Electronics. The complexity of the product they will make is also higher, with a more complex PCB being produced and more intricate soldering being required.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students are building upon the knowledge they gained in Year 7, which they covered the basic principles of electronics (voltage, current and resistance), how a resistor value is calculated, how a switch works, along with how to solder effectively and safely.

Year 8

Continue the Introduction to workshop tools / machines specifically the centre lathe.

Unit Title

Design and manufacture Screwdriver and Screwdriver holder

Key Question

Are screwdrivers made this way or are CNC machines preferred in high production situations.

Threshold Concepts

Students are introduced to CNC Machines and are taught to use a manual Centre Lathe.  They must be able to understand the advantages and disadvantages of Computer Numerically Controlled machines compared to Manually controlled machines. Students will have a clear understanding of the design process including:

·       Design Brief

·       Research and Investigation

·       Specification

·       Design Ideas / Solution

·       Modelling and Prototyping

·       Manufacture / Making

·       Testing and Evaluation

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will have a clear understanding of the health and safety condition while working in a design environment, they would have been introduced to the design process and have a basic understanding of the stages involved with manufacturing

Year 8

 

Unit Title

Food Science principles

Key Question

How does oil and water not separate when making a mayonnaise?

How does a biological raising agent work?

How does a fat produce a shortening texture?

Threshold Concepts

Students will build upon their Food Science introduction in Year 7, looking more closely into Food science principles and more complex cooking methods.

Students will use fish, cutting it into even pieces and then coating it using flour, egg and fresh crumbs. They will use emulsification to produce a successful homemade mayonnaise, whilst learning of the key ingredient of lecithin that allows this to happen. They will progress into making rough puff pastry, which covers lamination and shortening, key concepts in the GCSE ‘Fats’ topic.

Students will begin to learn about raising agents, in particular a biological raising agent, yeast. They will produce bread buns, to show the fermentation process and what conditions are needed for yeast to grow successfully.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will build upon their health and safety knowledge in the food room, being able to move around the food safely and use equipment safely. They will use the bridge and claw method again to chop food safely. 

 

 

Year 8

 

Unit Title

Mechanical devices

Key Question

How do we create types of motion?

Threshold Concepts

Students will understand the terms Linkages and Mechanisms, looking at the use of levers. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of analysing data to inform research, charts and graphs. They will understand the impact hat production has on the environment and the 6 R’s of recycling.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will have an understanding of graphics techniques and have been introduced to CADCAM to support in manufacturing products. They will understand the different graphics techniques used using a range of drawing skills.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 8 Technology department curriculum, please click here.

Year 9

Year 9

 

Unit Title

Safety Light

Key Question

What are Integrated Circuits and where is there evidence of their use in everyday electronic products and systems?

Threshold Concepts

Students will complete a project which is to introduce them to integrated circuits, and will then be introduced to microcontrollers and flow chart programming. They are made to see that integrated circuits and microcontrollers are now an Industry standard, and that companies are very heavily reliant upon. This will then give them a good foundation for their GCSE NEA project. Students will also use the CNC laser cutter to produce part of their final product, further exposing them to industry compatible equipment and modern engineering processes and techniques that they may choose to incorporate in their GCSE project.

Link to Prior Knowledge

In Years 7 and 8, students have been taught basic circuit theory and component recognition. They have learned to understand what sensing circuits are and where they are used.

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The strong motivation throughout the teaching of electronics at Key Stage 3 is that students ‘learn by doing’. This is very evident in the way that subject knowledge is built up from basic concepts through to the programming of microcontrollers. 

Year 9

 

Unit Title

Design and manufacture Passive Speaker project.

Key Question

What principle is being exploited by the speaker in order to amplify sound. Would a different material change the output?

Threshold Concepts

Students must become familiar and confident in the use of a range of power tools and larger machinery. Students must have a reasonable understanding of different Resistant Materials and how their propertied make them suitable for different applications, for example They will know the difference between thermoplastic and thermosetting plastic, and be able to identify several examples of both.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will have an understanding of the range of tools used in the workshop, they would have used resistant materials in previous years but will have a more in depth understanding of the range of resistant materials and their uses for different products

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

Year 9 utilise design knowledge and machining skills learnt throughout key stage 3 to accurately ‘mark out’ remove material and produce accurate finishes to produce a quality product or their own choosing. To ensure individuality of outcome, all students decorate their speaker with logos drawn on TechSoft CAD software and produced on the laser cutter.

Year 9

 

Unit Title

Coagulation and gelatinisation

Key Question

Which foods do coagulation apply to?

How does gelatinisation set a mixture?

Which foods does gelatinisation apply to?

Threshold Concepts

Students in Year 9 will cover the key Food Science topics of gelatinisation and coagulation. They will investigate the key concept of gelatinisation and how this applies to a starch when heated using moist heat. They will make a white sauce, using the roux method to complete these. A practical will also be completed to look at the effects of coagulation when heating a protein. They will be able to identify which food it applies to and what effect it has on the texture of food.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will build upon their health and safety knowledge in the food room, being able to move around the food safely and use equipment safely. They will use the bridge and claw method again to chop food safely

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The knowledge that students cover at Key Stage 3, broadly follows the skills that students are required to complete within the GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition. There are 12 main practical skills that are identified within the specification, so students will have an introduction to a selection of these skills. The practical activities and theory work, that students cover from years 7-9 do become more involved and technical as they progress through the programme. For instance, reduction sauces covered in Year 7 is far simpler in skill and theory, than is coagulation of a protein which is covered in Year 9.

Year 9

 

Unit Title

Communication techniques

Key Question

How do we identify the client and user to create a design solution?

Threshold Concepts

Students will learn about the life cycle of a product. They will be taught how designers and engineers and production staff plan every stage of the manufacture so that the effect of the product over its life span has the minimum effect on the environment.

Link to Prior Knowledge

In Years 7 and 8, students have begun to appreciate the basics of Graphic techniques and research.

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The study throughout Lower School enables students to gain knowledge needed to prepare them for their GCSE exam and NEA.

In Year 7 students learn basic graphic skills needed to effectively communicate their ideas alongside theory in Paper and Board. These skills are built on in Year 8 and 9 where they advance their drawing techniques, knowledge in design and manufacturing.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 9 Technology department curriculum, please click here.

Food Preparation and Nutrition

Year 10

 

Autumn Term

Unit Title

Protein

Key Question

Why are Proteins needed by the body and in which foods are they found in?

Why is food cooked and how can I select an appropriate cooking method?

How does coagulation, denaturation, foam formation and gluten formation occur and how does it affect the sensory properties of a food product?

Where and how is food reared and caught?

Threshold Concepts

Students will know and understand how a protein is used by the body. They will be able to identify which foods contain animal and vegetable protein and which variety can be eaten by individuals with different dietary requirements.

Students will look at the reasons behind why food is cooked, including for sensory and hygiene reasons. They will be able to successfully describe how conduction, convection and radiation works, alongside describing the sensory changes it has on food.

Students will understand the Food Science topics surrounding protein, including coagulation, denaturation, foam formation and gluten formation. They will be able to identify which foods these occur in and what are the external factors that cause these changes to happen

Along with the theory involving protein, students will also begin to look at wider issues in the course, including where and how is food reared or caught, in particular free-range vs intensively farmed animals. What are the conditions that affect food growth and how can food security be improved across the world?

Link to Prior Knowledge

In KS3 students begun to study how to safely prepare and produce food, this unit is there first introduction to GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition, which will build upon those skills. In year 9, students looked at coagulation and denaturation, when discussing how their Quiche changed its sensory properties during heating, students will know learn a more in depth reasoning behind this. In year 7, students began to look at conduction, convection and radiation. This unit will expand upon this, looking into more cooking methods and the effect it has on the sensory properties of the food, along with the rationale for why food is cooked.

Year 10

Spring Term

Unit Title

Fat

Key Question

Why are Fats needed by the body and in which foods are they found in?

How does plasticity, shortening, aeration and emulsification affect the sensory properties of the food we consume and how do they occur?

What are the current government guidelines for ensuring a healthy and well-balanced diet?

How can micro-organisms be used in food production?

 

 

Threshold Concepts

Students will look at why a fat is necessary in the diet and its main functions, they will be able to list a wide range of fats including into what category they fall into. Students will be able to identify the difference between a solid and a liquid fat and how to categorise them.

Students will look into the key Food Science topics involved with fats focusing on shortening, aeration, emulsification and plasticity. They will investigate factors that can affect these properties, mainly through a NEA 1 mini investigation.

Students will look in depth and the Eatwell Guide and decipher how it can be used to ensure the food that we eat is fit for purpose and meets the most up to date government guidelines. Students will be able to communicate the details of the legislation and make suggestions to given diets to make it more in line with the recommendations. They will then look more in depth into Coronary Heart Disease and its link to saturated fat intake. Students will be able to advise on how a person with this condition should adjust their diet and how they can prevent further complications. Students will be able to explain which lifestyle factors and foods can contribute to the ever growing condition.

Students will look into how micro-organisms can be used as a positive in food production, in particular to make cheese and yoghurt. They will know all of the stages involved, along with the sensory and nutritional changes that take place throughout.

Link to Prior Knowledge

In Key stage three, students have briefly discussed a healthy diet, but this is a relatively new teaching concept. All of the food science topics are all new to students, as they have not been covered previously due to the limited time allocated to key stage 3.

Year 10

Summer, Half Term 1

Summer, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Carbohydrates

Vitamins and Minerals

Key Question

What are carbohydrates and why are they needed by the body?

How do the food science topics of gelatinisation, dextrinization and caramelisation affect the sensory properties of a food product and what factors affect these?

What is Genetically modified food, what are the advantages and disadvantages of using these?

How does an individual’s Physical Activity Level (PAL) affect their dietary requirement?

What causes a person to develop Type 2 Diabetes and what dietary advice can be given to help them manage the health risks involved.

 

What are the Function and sources of vitamins and minerals?

What are the deficiency and excess of vitamins and minerals?

Which are the fat and water soluble vitamins and how does this affect the food we consume?

How can we prevent vitamins and minerals being lost during the cooking process?

How can iron deficiency anaemia, bone health osteoporosis and rickets be influenced by the diet and how can we prevent these?

 

Threshold Concepts

Students will look at carbohydrates and understand what their functions are in the diet. They will be able to understand which foods fall into the monosaccharides, disaccharides and polysaccharides category. They will be able to explain what the effects of different sugars and complex carbohydrates has on the diet and health of an individual.

Students will look at what PAL is and how it can vary through different life stages and depend upon how active a person is. They will be able to advise upon different diet requirements, depending upon the PAL of an individual. They will be able to describe this, along with what macronutrients are essential depending upon a person PAL.

Students will look at Genetically Modified Food, looking in particular at the advantages and disadvantages of using this type of food manufacturing process. Students will be aware of the reasons why individuals may choose to avoid a GM food, whereas the farmer may choose to use them due to the financial gains etc.

This smaller unit will cover vitamins and minerals in depth. Students will learn which foods contain which vitamins and minerals, along with looking at their specific function in the diet. Students will look in depth at the health conditions iron deficiency anaemia, bone health osteoporosis and rickets are influenced by the diet and how a deficiency in specific vitamins can lead to serious health problems.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will have limited experience of carbohydrates at KS3; however, in Year 9 they have covered Gelatinisation whilst producing a white sauce.

Students will have limited previous knowledge of this topic; however, may have knowledge due to any health conditions they or a family member may have.

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The structure of the course, allows students to concentrate on the three main macronutrients (carbohydrates, fats and proteins). The other topics are then interlaced throughout the units, which helps to ensure more knowledge retention as topics will be repeated slightly as they progress, with slightly different focuses. It also ensures that students have covered more of a spread of the course, as they reach key areas such as Year 10 exams and Year 11 rehearsal exams.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 10 Food Preparation and Nutrition curriculum, please click here.

Food Preparation and Nutrition

Year 11

 

Autumn, Half Term 1

 

Autumn, Half Term 2

Unit Title

NEA1

NEA2

Key Question

Students will be completing their exam, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ NEA (non-examined assessment) legislation

Students will be completing their exam, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ NEA (non-examined assessment) legislation

Threshold Concepts

Students will apply their previously gained knowledge, predominately from KS4, to answer one of three tasks given from AQA. They will investigate the chemical and functional properties of an ingredient and produce a 1500 to 2000-word written report.

Students will apply their previously gained knowledge to answer one of three briefs set by AQA. They will research a particular life stage or cuisine and produce 4 development dishes. This will then be followed by a 3 hour practical examination.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This will link mainly to the food science topics covered throughout Year 10.

This will link mainly to the food science topics covered throughout Year 10.

Year 11

Spring, Half Term 1

Spring, Half Term 2

Unit Title

NE2

Key Question

Students will be completing their exam, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ NEA (non-examined assessment) legislation

Threshold Concepts

Students will apply their previously gained knowledge to answer one of three briefs set by AQA. They will research a particular life stage or cuisine and produce 4 development dishes. This will then be followed by a 3 hour practical examination.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This will link mainly to the food science topics covered throughout Year 10.

Year 11

Summer, Half Term 1

 

Unit Title

REVISION

 

Key Question

Students will cover all of the specification, focusing on long written answers and multiple choice questions.

 

Threshold Concepts

Students will cover topics they have visited during the two year course, to revise in preparation for their GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition written examination.

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

All of the GCSE specification.

 

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

 

OCR Engineering Manufacture

OCR Engineering Manufacture

Year 10

 

Autumn, Half Term 1

 

Autumn, Half Term 2

Unit Title

R109: Engineering materials, processes, and production – Learning Outcome One: Know about properties and uses of engineering materials.

R109: Engineering materials, processes, and production – Learning Outcome Two: Understand engineering processes and their application.

Key Question

How do you categorise the properties and applications of engineering materials?

How can engineering processes be used effectively to create a successful engineered product?

Threshold Concepts

Students will know about, understand and be able to apply knowledge of:

 

Types of engineering materials, i.e.

 

·       Metals – ferrous and alloys, Non-ferrous and alloys and their application in engineered products

 

·       Polymers – thermoplastics and thermosetting and their application in engineered products

 

·       Ceramics, composites and smart materials 

 

·       The application of new and emerging technologies

 

·       The properties of engineering materials and the suitability for use

 

·       The process of testing materials

 

·       Working characteristics of engineering materials

 

·       Uses of specific materials

 

Students will apply their knowledge via a practical application of metals and processes theory to produce a functional engineered product. Part of which will include an element of their coursework portfolio.

 

Students will also become well-versed in exam technique via regular exam technique practice and be able to apply they key engineering terminology via formal and summative assessment.

Students will know about, understand and be able to apply knowledge of:

 

Engineering processes, i.e.

 

·       Methods of material removal

 

·       Traditional methods of hand forming

 

·       Joining methods; permanent and temporary

 

·       Heat treatment to improve the working characteristics of materials

 

·       Surface finishing

 

·       Machine processes

 

·       Machine-based forming techniques

 

·       Methods of moulding metals and plastics

 

·       The safe use of tools and equipment including risk assessments

 

 

 

Continuation of regular exam technique practice via tailored methods of feedback.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit builds upon students’ previous experience of working with tools and machines in Year 7. They are introduced to machining, Computer Numerical Control (CNC) and scales of manufacturing in Year 8.  Finally, they are introduced to Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacture (CAD/CAM) and the environment/sustainable manufacturing in Year 9. This unit also introduces several new concepts including robotics, automation, and in-depth knowledge of traditional, smart, and modern materials.

This unit builds upon students’ previous knowledge of machine and hand tools, mechanisms, including motion, levers, cams, pulleys, and gears in Year 8. Students are also familiar with electronic systems which they are first introduced to in year 8 and then again in year 9.

 

By Year 9, students will have a basic understanding of engineering processes. This unit requires students to build upon their foundation of knowledge and be able to apply it to real-life scenarios. 

 

Year 10

Spring, Half Term 1

 

Spring, Half Term 2

Unit Title

R109: Engineering materials, processes, and production –

 

·       Learning Outcome Three: Know about developments in engineering processes.

 

·       Learning Outcome Four: Understand the impact of modern technologies on engineering production

R110: Preparing and planning for manufacture –

 

·       Learning Outcome One: Be able to plan for the making of a pre-production product

 

·       Learning Outcome Two: Be able to use processes, tools, and equipment safely to make a pre-production product

 

·       Learning Outcome Three: Be able to modify a production plan for different scales of production

Key Question

LO3: How can the use of CNC equipment impact the quality of engineering manufacture?

 

LO4: How can modern technologies impact the speed/efficiency in which engineered products are manufactured and research is conducted?

LO1: How does effective planning of a sequence of events impact the speed in which a prototype is successfully manufactured?

 

LO2: Can the selection of engineering skills determine the quality of a prototype?

 

LO3: How can a production plan/method be speedily adapted to take a product to mass production?

Threshold Concepts

Students will know about, understand and be able to apply knowledge of:

 

LO3: Applications of computer-controlled production processes, i.e.

 

·       CNC machining processes

 

·       The use of lasers to manufacture/improve quality control

 

·       Additive manufacturing and rapid prototyping processes

 

 

 

LO4: The impact of modern technologies in engineering production, i.e.

 

·       Automation of processes and their impact on output, quality, the workforce, and costs

 

·       The effective use of digital communications in research and development, material supply and control, and global manufacturing

 

 

Continuation of regular exam technique practice via tailored methods of feedback.

Students will know about, understand and be able to apply knowledge of:

 

LO1: Skills required to be able to plan for manufacture, i.e.

 

·       Interpretation of 2D and 3D engineering drawings

 

·       Standard drawing conventions

 

·       Production plans for the making of a pre-production product

 

 

LO2: Selection of engineering processes to create a successful product, i.e.

 

·       Appropriate processes for making a pre-production product

 

·       How to use tools and equipment when making products

 

·       How to follow safe working procedures when using tools and equipment

 

·       How to use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) appropriately

 

·       Use quality control checks

 

 

LO3: Appropriate scales of manufacture and their impact on production plans, i.e.

 

·       Consideration of scales of manufacture

 

·       Impact of quantities of production on production plans

 

Continuation of regular exam technique practice via tailored methods of feedback.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit builds upon students’ knowledge gained throughout years 7, 8 and 9 where they learn about CNC machines and processes, and scales of manufacture. There are many new concepts in this unit which require students to use knowledge gained in learning outcomes one and two, particularly in material and processes in order to understand these new concepts.

 

This unit builds upon students’ knowledge gained in Years 7, 8 & 9 via safe use of machines and equipment in the workshops, the use of engineering drawings, methods of quality control and being able to plan for successful manufacture of products.

Year 10

Summer, Half Term 1

Summer, Half Term 1

Unit Title

R110: Coursework portfolio

R111: Computer aided manufacturing

Key Question

Students will be completing their coursework, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ coursework legislation

LO1: What important factors need to be considered when planning for CNC manufacture?

 

LO2: How essential are engineering drawings in creating 3D models?

 

LO3: What checks are required to safely operate CNC equipment?

 

LO4: What are the modern developments in engineering production?

Threshold Concepts

Students are given a prescribed product to plan for manufacture. This will include students creating working engineering drawings to manufacture the product, applying safe working procedures with tools and equipment, and conducting quality control on the product. Students will demonstrate this in their individual completion of their coursework portfolio.

 

 

Students will know about, understand and be able to apply knowledge of:

 

LO1: Factors to consider when producing CNC machining plans, i.e.

 

·       Planning for CNC operations

 

·       Scale of manufacture – waste minimisation

 

·       Type of CNC machines

 

·       Types of CNC tooling

 

·       Programming of CNC machines including speed and feed rates

 

LO2: Interpret CAD information to safely run CNC machines, i.e.

 

·       Use of CAD packages

 

·       Factors to consider when performing CNC machining operations

 

LO3: Be able to set-up and use CNC equipment, i.e.

 

·       Procedures for setting up CNC equipment

 

·       Procedures to produce products to a given specification

 

·       Methods used to compare manually, and CNC produced products

 

LO4: Know about modern methods of computer-controlled processes, i.e.

 

·       Applications of computer control

 

·       Rapid prototyping

 

·       Manufacturing processes

 

·       Use of robotics in industry

 

·       Application of CNC processes for different scales of manufacture

 

Continuation of regular exam technique practice via tailored methods of feedback.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will be required to apply knowledge gained across Year 10 in units R109 and R110 to successfully complete their coursework.

Students will build on their prior knowledge from Year 7, 8 & 9, specifically in manufacturing processes and use of CAD software to create 3D models. Students will apply their foundation of knowledge to get to grips with the new concepts in this unit.

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The structuring of this course allows students to build upon topics they have been introduced to in KS3 and deepen this knowledge whilst being introduced to the more complex concepts in each unit. The sequence of learning is designed to enable students to have acquired the knowledge they need to apply it using the skills they have gained across the ‘theory’ units.

This will then be applied to the completion of students’ coursework. Coursework will be completed independently.

 

 

OCR Engineering Manufacture

Year 11

 

Autumn, Half Term 1

 

Autumn, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Exam revision for January

R111: Coursework portfolio

Key Question

What is the question asking you to do?

Students will be completing their coursework, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ coursework legislation

Threshold Concepts

Consolidation of unit R109 theory. Exam technique practice. Students will be required to recall concepts in detail and apply their knowledge to set scenarios to successfully complete their 1-hour exam.

Students are given a prescribed product to plan for manufacture. This will include students creating working engineering drawings to manufacture the product, applying safe working procedures with tools and equipment, and conducting quality control on the product. Students will demonstrate this in their individual completion of their coursework portfolio.

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will revisit concepts covered in units R109 – R111.

Students will be required to apply knowledge gained across Year 10 in units R109 – R111 to successfully complete their coursework for this unit.

Year 11

Spring, Half Term 1

 

Spring, Half Term 2

Unit Title

R112: Quality control of engineered products

R112: Coursework portfolio

Key Question

LO1: How important is quality control in the manufacture of engineered products?

 

LO2: How do we inspect quality of engineered products?

 

LO3: How can modern technologies be used for quality control?

 

LO4: How do we apply principles of lean manufacturing?

Students will be completing their coursework, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ coursework legislation

Threshold Concepts

Students will know about, understand and be able to apply knowledge of:

 

LO1: Understand the importance of quality control

 

·       Reasons for implementing quality control and its impact on the quality of products

 

·       Quality control procedures and how to safely apply them

 

LO2: Be able to assess product quality via inspection techniques

 

·       Quality control techniques used in stages of production

 

·       Application of inspection checks

 

·       Use of specialist inspection equipment

 

·       Techniques in evaluating product quality

 

LO3: Know about modern technologies in quality control

 

·       Application of modern technologies to ensure a safe and high-quality product is produced

 

LO4: Know the principles of lean manufacturing

 

·       Causes of waste in manufacturing

 

·       Categories of waste

 

·       Methods of reducing waste

 

·       Sustainable design and its impact on the environment

Students will inspect their manually and CNC produced coursework products through investigating, experimenting, and applying a range of quality control techniques. Students will demonstrate this in their individual completion of their coursework portfolio.

 

 

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students have covered sustainable design in Years 7, 8 & 9. Students will have a solid foundation of knowledge and practical application of quality control via their study of units R109 – R111.

Students will apply their knowledge of quality control techniques covered in units R109 – R111.

Year 11

Summer, Half Term 1

Summer, Half Term 1

Unit Title

Exam revision for end of year exam

 

Key Question

What is the question asking you to do?

 

Threshold Concepts

Consolidation of unit R109 theory. Exam technique practice. Students will be required to recall concepts in detail and apply their knowledge to set scenarios to successfully complete their 1-hour exam.

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

Students will revisit concepts covered in units R109 – R111.

 

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The structuring of this course allows students to build upon topics they have been introduced to in KS3 and deepen this knowledge whilst being introduced to the more complex concepts in each unit. The sequence of learning is designed to enable students to have acquired the knowledge they need to apply it using the skills they have gained across the ‘theory’ units.

This will then be applied to the completion of students’ coursework. Coursework will be completed independently.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 10 & 11OCR Engineering Manufacture curriculum, please click here.

Year 10 GCSE Design and Technology

Design and Technology

Year 10

 

Autumn, Half Term 1

 

Autumn, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Unit 1 New and emerging technologies

Unit 2 Energy, materials, systems and devices.

 

Key Question

How do new and emerging technologies affect the workplace, the consumer and the environment?

How is energy generated and stored?

How are modern, smart and composite materials selected for specific applications?

How do mechanical and electronic systems work?

Threshold Concepts

Students will know about and understand:

·        The impact of new and emerging technologies on tools and equipment.

·        How robotics has affected the workplace.

·        How co-operative and fair trade organisations operate.

·        How new technologies need to be developed and produced in a
sustainable way.

·        The impact that excessive use of certain resources has on the environment.

·        How technology push and market pull affect consumer choice and employment.

·        How changes in fashion and trends affect designers and manufacturers.

·        Contemporary and potential future use of automation, Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM).

·        How products can be designed to be repaired and recycled.

 

Students will know about and understand:

·        How power is generated from oil, gas, coal and nuclear sources.

·        How renewable energy is generated from a variety of sources.

     How to identify mechanical and chemical power and understand how it is stored.

·        A range of modern, smart and composite materials.

·        Photochromic particles and pigments.

·        The unique properties of technical textiles.

·        That all systems comprise of one or more inputs, processes and outputs. And be able to recognise input, process and output components.

·        The different types of mechanical movement.

·        How first, second and third order levers function.

·        How linkages change the direction of movement.

·        How to recognise different types of cams and followers.

·        How the action of gear trains transmit and transform the effects of forces.

·        That pulleys can change the magnitude of force required to lift mass.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit builds upon students’ previous experience of working with electronic components, tools and machines in year 7. They are introduced to machining, Computer Numerical Control and scales of manufacturing in year 8.  Finally, they are introduced to designers, Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacture and the environment/sustainable manufacturing in year 9.

This unit also introduces several new concepts including robotics and automation.

This unit builds upon students’ previous knowledge of mechanisms, including motion, levers, cams, pulleys and gears in Year 8.

Students are also familiar with electronic systems which they are first introduced to in year 8 and then again in year 9.

This unit also introduces power sources, modern, smart and composite materials.

Year 10

Spring, Half Term 1

 

Spring, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Unit 3 Materials and their working properties.

Unit 4 Common specialist technical principles.

 

Key Question

How do new and emerging technologies affect the workplace, the consumer and the environment?

 

How do forces and stresses, ecological and social issues and scales of production affect products ?

Threshold Concepts

Students will know about and understand:

Note: Each of the following learning outcomes apply to five key material areas: Papers and boards, Natural and manufactured timbers, Metals and alloys, Polymers and Textiles

·        Know the primary sources of materials for producing a variety of materials in each of five key material areas.

·        Be able to characterise different types of materials in each key area and understand how the physical and working properties of a material products affect their performance and selection.

 

 

Students will know about and understand:

·        The different forces and stresses.

·        How materials have been stiffened or reinforced.

·        An ecological footprint, including how deforestation, mining, drilling and farming affect our ecology and that carbon dioxide is produced during the manufacture of products and its influence on global warming.

·        A social footprint and how safe working conditions impact on others.

·        How products are produced in each of the four main scales of production.

·        Continuous production – This is used for products in constant demand that require little modification. Primary processing of materials is often suitable for continuous production.

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit builds upon students’ knowledge gained throughout years 7,8 and 9. Students have worked with all the five key material categories throughout the three years more than once. They have been introduced to primary sources of materials and material properties.

This unit then deepens this knowledge and considers the effect on performance and application.

This unit builds upon the students’ introduction to sustainability, the environment and scales of production received in year 9.

This unit then introduces forces, stresses and reinforcement.

Year 10

Summer, Half Term 1

Summer, Half Term 1

Unit Title

Unit 6 Designing Principles

NEA

Key Question

How does analysing data and the consideration of the influences of other designers affect a successful design strategy?

Students will be completing their exam, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ NEA (non-examined assessment) legislation

Threshold Concepts

Students will know about and understand:

·        The difference between primary and secondary research.

·        How to gather anthropometric research and interpret the use of percentiles in anthropometric data, leading to ergonomic design.

·        The work of at least two designers.

·        The work of at least two design companies.

·        How to write an appropriate design brief and specification?

·        The cycle of iterative designing.

·        How to avoid design fixation?

·        How to draw in isometric projection.

·        The use of exploded drawings.

·        How to produce a 3rd angle orthographic projection?

·        How to fully analyse a products suitability.

 

Students will be identifying and investigating design possibilities from a given contextual challenge released by the exam board on June 1st.

Link to Prior Knowledge

This unit build upon students’ prior introduction to designers in year 8. Students have knowledge of design briefs and specifications, which has been covered on several projects throughout KS3. Students have also practiced the skill of drawing in isometric projection and orthographic project several times in KS3.

This unit then introduces market research and the iterative design process.

The NEA will link back to aspects of all the units covered in Year 10.

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The structuring of this course allows students to build upon topics they have been introduced to in KS3 and deepen this knowledge whilst being introduced to the more complex concepts in each unit. The sequence of this is designed to enable students to have acquired the knowledge they need to apply it using the skills they practice towards the end of the course.

This then leads to the Non-Examined Assessment when all of the knowledge and skills will have to be combined independently.

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 10 & 11 Design and Technology curriculum, please click here.

Year 10 GCSE Design and Technology

Design and Technology

Year 11

 

Autumn, Half Term 1

 

Autumn, Half Term 2

Unit Title

NEA

NEA           

Key Question

Students will be completing their exam, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ NEA (non-examined assessment) legislation

Students will be completing their exam, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ NEA (non-examined assessment) legislation

Threshold Concepts

Producing a design brief and specification and Generating design ideas for their chosen NEA project.

Developing design ideas for their chosen NEA project.

Link to Prior Knowledge

The NEA will link back to aspects of all the units covered in Year 10.

The NEA will link back to aspects of all the units covered in Year 10.

Year 11

Spring, Half Term 1

 

Spring, Half Term 2

Unit Title

NEA

NEA

Key Question

Students will be completing their exam, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ NEA (non-examined assessment) legislation

Students will be completing their exam, with limited guidance and questioning occurring in lessons, due to JCQ NEA (non-examined assessment) legislation

Threshold Concepts

Realising design ideas for their chosen NEA project.

Analysing & evaluating their chosen NEA project.

Link to Prior Knowledge

The NEA will link back to aspects of all the units covered in Year 10.

The NEA will link back to aspects of all the units covered in Year 10.

Year 11

Summer, Half Term 1

Summer, Half Term 1

Unit Title

REVISION

 

Key Question

Do you understand the question?

 

Threshold Concepts

Revising key knowledge and exam technique.

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

This links to all aspects of GCSE D&T.

 

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The knowledge covers everything students have learned in their GCSE course. The sequence is decided by the exam board.

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 10 & 11 Design and Technology curriculum, please click here.

Technology Staff