Languages

Our curriculum intent: why we teach what we teach in Languages

  • Students will learn a love of and curiosity for foreign languages, developing both the breadth and depth of their knowledge which will enable them to both understand and communicate effectively with someone from a different linguistic background.

  • Students will be able to step beyond their own familiar cultural boundaries and appreciate the diversity, customs and traditions of others. Through building relationship with those from other cultures we engender tolerance, respect, empathy and compassion.

  • Students will become life-long learners who develop confidence in problem solving, analysis, independence of mind and creativity. Such skills provide the tools to succeed in an increasingly globalised workplace.

Languages curriculum intent

Curriculum

Year 7 French
Year 7

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

 

Autumn Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Functional language. Describing myself and others.
Key Question How can we use French to meet and greet others, and to give basic information about ourselves? How can French be used to describe ourselves and others?
Threshold Concepts

·         Gender of nouns.

·         Definite articles, indefinite articles.

·         Possessive adjectives.

·         Adjectival agreement with nouns.

·         The negative.

·         Regular -er verb conjugation.

·         Question words (The interrogative).

·         Irregular adjectival agreement.

·         Key irregular verb( avoir and être) .

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Any French taught in KS2 (variable depending on feeder primary).

·         Knowledge of literacy (English) including nouns, verbs and adjectives.

·         Basic adjective agreement.

·         Knowledge of basic question and answer structures (from autumn term).

 

  Spring Term, Half Term 1 Spring Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Life at school. Free time activities.
Key Question How can French be used to describe the school day and express opinions, and how do French schools differ from our own? How can French be used to talk about free time activities?
Threshold Concepts

·         Turning statements into a question.

·         Connectives.

·         Intensifiers.

·         The personal pronoun on.

·         Cognates.

·         The verb jouer with prepositions au / à la / aux.

·         The verb faire with prepositions du / de la / des.

·         Expressing likes and dislikes with aimer.

·         Subject pronouns ils  and elles..

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Understanding how to ask questions.

·         Basic verb conjugation.

·         Numbers (for telling the time).

·         Use of aimer plus a noun.

·         Understanding that the infinitive is the unchanged part of the verb.

·         Singular conjugations of être.

  Summer Term, Half Term 1 Summer Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Where I live. Holidays.
Key Question How can French be used to give and understand directions in town, and to invite others to go somewhere? How do we talk about future plans and desires in French?
Threshold Concepts

·         The use of il y a … and il n’y a pas de …

·         Expressing opinions with à mon avis and je pense que.

·         Using tu and vous.

·         Prepositions of place.

·         The verb aller and its use with the prepositions au / à l’ / à la / aux.

·         Key irregular verbs vouloir and pouvoir.

·         Reflexive verbs in the present tense.

·         The near future tense with aller plus an infinitive.

·         The structure Je voudrais + infinitive.

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Use of à after jouer.

·         Understanding of masculine, feminine and plural nouns.

·         Knowing the difference between a conjugated verb and an infinitive.

·         Numbers up to 100.

Assessment

Assessment 1: Term 1 (Reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Modules 1).

Assessment 2: Term 2 (Listening, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Module 2).

Assessment 3: Annual exam (Speaking, listening, reading and writing).

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The Year 7 curriculum is designed to be knowledge rich, providing a firm foundation in terms of core structures and vocabulary and acting as a springboard for sustained progress throughout Key Stage 3.

Knowledge is taught contextually, using a range of topics which stimulate students’ curiosity of the French speaking world, such as the school system, holiday preferences and the tourist attractions of major French towns.  The topics taught are age appropriate, corresponding to the interests and lifestyles of young people in their first year of secondary school.  The core grammatical structures taught are carefully sequenced to ensure students make progress in a coherent and logical manner.  Reflexive verbs, for example, are only introduced once students have a firm grasp of the present tense.  Spaced retrieval practice enables students to recall material on a regular basis, allowing for key knowledge to be effectively embedded.

The curriculum has a carefully planned progression which clearly builds upon the Key Stage 2 languages programmes of study.  In Key stage 2, for example, students learn how to provide and understand simple descriptions of people and places. This core language is revisited in Year 7, but extended with a wider range of vocabulary and new concepts such as adjectival agreement.  Primary school pupils use basic verb structures, but in Year 7, there is formal teaching of subject pronouns and the present tense which constitutes clear progress from Key Stage 2. In the primary years there is, quite rightly, a focus upon exploring the sounds and patterns of language using rhymes and songs; this is capitalised upon in Year 7 where there is an explicit emphasis upon phonics and pronunciation practice.

As students make progress through the curriculum and deepen their knowledge of core structures and vocabulary, they are provided with regular opportunities to apply their knowledge in speaking and writing, thus establishing a clear link between the theory and practice of language.   The vocabulary and structures taught also provide students with the tools to understand spoken and written language from a variety of sources. Translation from and into the target language is introduced in Year 7 and is an effective way to focus attention upon the need for precision and accurate use of language.

Through the cultural research task which takes place after the annual examination, students broaden their horizons and gain a deeper appreciation of the wider world. This is complemented by a study of literary texts, songs and poems which enhance students’ appreciation of le monde francophone.

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 7 Languages department curriculum, please click here.

Year 8 French

Year 8 – lower sets

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

 

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Talking about TV, films, reading, and the Internet.

 

A visit to Paris.

Key Question

How do we express preferences regarding the media in French, and talk about what to do in certain weather conditions?

How can French be used to talk about holidays, and to find out about tourist attractions?

Threshold Concepts

·         Key regular –er verbs in the present tense.

·         Irregular verbs do not fit established rules (Faire, Aller)

·         Negative (ne..pas)

·         Interrogative forms (Qu’est-ce que and Est-ce que).

·         Using intensifiers and connectives to increase complexity in speech and writing (assez, aussi, mais).

·         Modal verbs with the infinitive (on peut)

·         Extension of interrogative forms

·         The perfect tense (regular verbs with avoir auxiliary).

·         Using the negative with the perfect tense.

·         Expressing opinions in the perfect tense.

·         Using sequencing words to link statements.

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Present tense conjugation of -er verbs.

·         Familiarity with avoir and être.

·         That the definite article is used when expressing opinions in French, where it is not needed in English.

·         Weather phrases.

·         Use of the verb aimer including in the negative.

·         Use of il y a.

·         Asking questions.

 

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Talking about identity

Talking about where I live

Key Question

How can we use French to give more details about personality, relationships and interests?

How can French be used to describe our home and mealtimes, and talk about special events?

Threshold Concepts

·         Adjectival agreement using a range of different adjectival endings.

·         Using quand and si.

·         Perfect tense with être and agreement of the past participle.

·         Tenses can be combined using time phrases to create more interesting sentences.

·         Common irregular adjectives (vieux).

·         Expressing intent with je voudrais.

·         Prepositions to describe location.

·         Partitive article.

·         The structure il faut + infinitive.

·         Using three tenses to produce a detailed and more complex piece of writing.

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Adjectival agreement.

·         Use of the pronoun on.

·         Near future and perfect tense constructions.

·         Placement of adjectives.

·         Noun gender.

·         Use of il y a and il n’y a pas de.

·         Prepositions.

·         Rule that de + le = du.

·         Near future and perfect tense constructions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Talking about talents and competitions.

The French-speaking world.

Key Question

How can we use French to talk about our talents and future ambitions, and give instructions?

How widely is French spoken across the world?

Threshold Concepts

·         Modal verbs and use with the infinitive.

·         The imperative.

·         Qualifying adjectives with intensifiers.

·         French is spoken in all continents except Antarctica.

·         Different countries have different characteristics.

·         The impact of historical events upon the present.

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Modal verbs and infinitives.

·         Adjectival agreement.

·         Use of je voudrais + infinitive.

·         Knowledge of geography, particularly Europe, Africa and North America.

Assessment

Assessment 1: Term 1 (Reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Modules 1+2)

Assessment 2: Term 2 (Listening, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Module 3)

Assessment 3: Annual exam (Speaking, listening, reading and writing)

 

Year 8 – upper sets

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

 

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Talking about TV, films, reading, and the Internet.

 

A visit to Paris.

Key Question

How do we express preferences regarding the media in French, and talk about activities in the past?

How can French be used to talk about holidays, and to find out about tourist attractions?

Threshold Concepts

·         Present tense of regular –er, -ir and –re verbs.

·         Key irregular verbs in the present tense: (aller and faire).

·         Negatives: (ne..pas and ne..jamais).

·         Time phrases, to express how often something happens (d’habitude, quelquefois).

·         Sequencers: d’abord, ensuite).

·         The perfect tense: (avoir auxiliary with regular er verb past participles).

·         The past participle of regular –ir and –re verbs.

·         Forming the negative in the perfect tense.

·         Irregular past participles.

·         Expressing opinions in the past tense.

·         Perfect tense with être.

·         Asking questions in the perfect tense.

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Present tense conjugation of -er verbs.

·         Familiarity with avoir and être.

·         That the definite article is used when expressing opinions in French, where it is not needed in English.

·         Construction of the perfect tense with regular -er verbs.

·         Understanding of masculine, feminine and plural nouns.

·         Asking questions.

 

 

 

 

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Talking about identity

Talking about where I live

Key Question

How can we use French to give more details about personality, relationships and interests?

How can French be used to describe our home and mealtimes, and talk about special events?

Threshold Concepts

·         Reflexive verbs are often used to describe relationships with others.

·         Adjectival agreement.

·         Opinion phrases can be used to express agreement or disagreement.

·         Using tenses and time phrases to create more interesting sentences.

·         Common irregular adjectives.

·         Comparative adjectives.

·         Prepositions to describe location.

·         Partitive article.

·         Common irregular verbs such as boire and prendre.

·         The structure il faut + infinitive.

·         Using three tenses to produce a detailed and more complex piece of writing.

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Adjectival agreement.

·         Reflexive verbs.

·         Near future and perfect tense constructions.

·         Placement of adjectives.

·         Noun gender.

·         Use of il y a and il n’y a pas de.

·         Prepositions.

·         Rule that de + le = du.

·         Near future and perfect tense constructions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Talking about talents and competitions.

The French-speaking world.

Key Question

How can we use French to talk about our talents and future ambitions, and give instructions?

How widely is French spoken across the world?

What is the significance of the French Revolution?

Threshold Concepts

·         Modal verbs and use with the infinitive.

·         The imperative.

·         Superlative adjectives.

 

·         French is spoken in all continents except Antarctica.

·         Different countries have different characteristics.

·         The impact of historical events upon the present.

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Modal verbs and infinitives.

·         Reflexive verbs.

·         Adjectival agreement.

·         Knowledge of geography, particularly Europe, Africa and North America.

Assessment

Assessment 1: Term 1 (Reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Modules 1+2)

Assessment 2: Term 2 (Listening, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Module 3)

Assessment 3: Annual exam (Speaking, listening, reading and writing)

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The content taught in year 8 has been selected to both extend students’ knowledge of the language and to stimulate curiosity of the French speaking world, e.g. French food, Paris, talent shows and the French Revolution.

Knowledge is carefully and sequentially built upon the Year 7 curriculum.  For example, Year 7 students learn language to express basic opinions with regard to school subjects and this is consolidated and extended in Year 8 where students learn how to express more sophisticated ideas and opinions regarding music preferences. New concepts such as the perfect tense develop coherently from Year 7 students’ introduction to regular present verbs and infinitives. 

The Year 8 curriculum is structured in such a way so as to link well with prior learning and prepare pupils for the next stage of their study, adding an increasing degree of complexity in what is taught.  Students progress from using a single tense in isolation, to manipulating verbs and vocabulary across three tenses, essential for making effective progress in Year 9.  Grammatical concepts such as the near future tense which were introduced in Year 7, are revisited in Year 8, allowing for effective retrieval practice and consolidation of knowledge in students’ long term memory.

Knowledge and skills are inextricably linked and the Year 8 curriculum is therefore designed to facilitate students’ ability to apply their knowledge with an increasing degree of sophistication in speaking and writing. The vocabulary and structures taught also provide students with the tools to understand and respond to both spoken and written language. Translation skills, introduced in Year 7 are strengthened in Year 8, providing the means for pupils to manipulate language with an increasing degree of precision and accuracy.

The cultural research task introduced following the annual examination, promotes students’ appreciation of the wider world, specifically “Le monde francophone”. This is complemented by a study of literary texts which enhances an appreciation of language and culture and exposes students to a varied and increasingly complex vocabulary.

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 8 French curriculum, please click here.

Year 9 French

Year 9 – lower sets

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Describing my social life

Healthy living

Key Question

How can French be used to give opinions on social activities and make arrangements to go out?

How can we use French to talk about healthy living and parts of the body in relation to sport and fitness?

Threshold Concepts

·         Responding to an invitation.

·         Irregular verbs (aller / vouloir).

·         Expressing frequency.

·         Using on in the perfect tense.

·         Use of the preposition à with the definite article.

·         Expressing agreement and disagreement.

·         Use of the partitive article in negative phrases.

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Adjective agreement in various forms.

·         Conjugation in the present tense of -er verbs, faire, avoir and être.

·         Perfect tense with avoir and être.

·         Noun genders.

·         Use of il faut + infinitive.

·         Use of the partitive article after manger.

·         Negatives : ne … pas and ne … jamais.

·         Near future tense.

 

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

The world of work

Holidays

Key Question

What are the main areas of work in France and how can French be used to talk about jobs and future plans?

How can French be used to talk about holidays and holiday plans?

Threshold Concepts

·         Gender can result in spelling change (directeur / directrice).

·         “False friends’ (words that look similar in both languages, but have different meanings).

·         Making spoken French sound more authentic with fillers (alors, voyons, euh),

·         Common irregular verbs(faire, aller, prendre)

·         Asking questions using inversion

·         Reflexive verbs  and reflexive pronouns

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Near future tense.

·         Noun genders.

·         Modal verbs including pouvoir.

·         Use of je voudrais.

·         Question words.

·         Use of je voudrais.

·         Perfect tense.

·         Possessive articles.

 

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

My place in the world

TBC pending ‘early start’ model

Key Question

How can we use French to discuss what people are and are not allowed to do, and to describe what is important.

 

Threshold Concepts

·         Expressions with avoir

·         Using possessive adjectives

·         Use of the infinitive to translate -ing

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Conjugation of avoir in different tenses.

·         The imperative.

 

Assessment

Assessment 1: Term 1 (Reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Modules 1+2)

Assessment 2: Term 2 (Listening, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Module 3)

Assessment 3: Annual exam (Speaking, listening, reading and writing)

 

Year 9 – upper sets

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Describing my social life

Healthy living

Key Question

How can French be used to give opinions on social activities and make arrangements to go out?

How can we use French to talk about parts of the body in relation to sport and fitness?

Threshold Concepts

·         Expressing frequency.

·         Direct object pronouns.

·         Using three tenses together.

·         Use of the preposition à with the definite article.

·         Depuis plus the present tense to say how long something has been happening.

·         Extended opinion phrases.

·         The future tense and irregular stems

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Adjective agreement in various forms.

·         Near future tense.

·         Asking questions.

·         Perfect tense with avoir and être.

·         Noun genders.

·         Use of il faut + infinitive.

·         Negatives : ne … pas and ne … jamais.

 

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

The world of work

Holidays

Key Question

What are the main areas of work in France and how can French be used to talk about jobs and future plans?

How can French be used to talk about holidays and holiday plans?

Threshold Concepts

·         Gender can result in spelling change (directeur / directrice)

·         The imperfect tense

·         Irregular stem of être

·         Making spoken French sound more authentic with fillers (alors, voyons, euh),

·         The pronoun y.

·         Asking questions using inversion

·         The conditional tense

·         Emphatic pronouns

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Noun genders.

·         Modal verbs.

·         Future tense.

·         Question words.

·         Future tense.

·         Imperfect tense.

·         Reflexive verbs.

·         Perfect tense

 

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

My place in the world

Theme 1 of GCSE: Me, my family and friends

Key Question

How can we use French to discuss what people are and are not allowed to do, and to describe what is important.

How can French be used to talk about my relationships with family and friends?

Threshold Concepts

·         Expressions with avoir

·         Using si in complex sentences

·         Using subordinate clauses

·         Using qui and que

·         Using indirect object pronouns

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Conjugation of avoir in different tenses.

·         The imperative.

·         Reflexive verbs

·         Adjectival agreement and position of adjectives

·         Immediate future and future tense

Assessment

Assessment 1: Term 1 (Reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Modules 1+2)

Assessment 2: Term 2 (Listening, writing, vocabulary and grammar: Module 3)

Assessment 3: Annual exam (Speaking, listening, reading and writing)

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The Year 9 curriculum is designed to build upon the knowledge and skills taught and developed in the preceding two years.  More complex and challenging structures are taught alongside a clear objective to deepen students’ understanding of French culture and customs.

New concepts and knowledge build upon the foundation laid in Years 7 and 8.  For example, Year 8 students learn language to express basic opinions and preferences with regard to food, and this is consolidated and extended in Year 9 where students learn to discuss their ideas with respect to the topic of healthy living.  New concepts such as the imperfect tense develop coherently from Year 8 students’ introduction to the perfect tense.

The Year 9 curriculum is constructed and sequenced to prepare students for GCSE language study and beyond.  Foundation tier students, for example, develop their expertise with the future tense and they are also introduced to a wider range of common irregular verbs. Higher tier students, on the other hand, progress from an understanding of subject pronouns to direct object pronouns.  Grammatical concepts such as the present, perfect and future tenses are revisited at both tiers in Year 9, allowing for effective retrieval practice and consolidation of knowledge in students’ long term memory.

Whilst there is a strong emphasis upon teaching core structures and vocabulary, the need for students to apply their knowledge effectively in speech and writing is not neglected and students are equipped with the tools to manipulate more complex language clearly and confidently.  The vocabulary and structures taught also provide students with the tools to understand and respond to spoken and written language from a variety of sources. Translation tasks from and into the target language build on expertise already acquired and provide another means of applying what has been taught.

The cultural research task enables pupils to investigate another aspect of French culture, promoting understanding and appreciation of the wider world.  A study of literary texts, including songs and poems impresses upon our students that our curriculum involves far more than simply the study of language.

 

 If you would like more in depth information about the Year 8 French curriculum, please click here.

Year 10 French

Year 10 – Foundation tier

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Theme 1:  Technology in everyday life

Theme 1: Free-time activities

Key Question

What influence does technology have on everyday life?

How can French be used to talk about free-time and leisure interests?

Threshold Concepts

·         Use of prepositions such as sans

·         Using grâce à

·         Emphatic pronouns

 

·         Demonstrative pronouns

·         Using subordinate clauses with quand, lorsque and si

·         The pronoun en

·         Prepositions used with jouer and faire

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Present tense of regular-er, -ir, re verbs

·         Common irregular verbs

Pronunciation of verb endings

·         Present tense regular verbs

·         Perfect tense

·         Quantities

·         Adverbs of frequency

 

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Theme 1: Customs and festivals

Theme 2:  Home, town and region

Key Question

How can I talk about customs and traditions not only in the United Kingdom, but in French-speaking countries too?

How can French be used to talk about my home, town and region?

Threshold Concepts

·         Reflexive verbs in the perfect tense

·         Imperfect tense

·         Deciding between the perfect and imperfect tenses

·         Using en/au/aux/à + countries and towns

·         De following negative phrases

·         Demonstrative adjectives

·         Prepositions of place

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Perfect tense

·         Reflexive verbs

·         Rules of agreement in the perfect tense

·         Position and agreement of adjectives

·         Plural of nouns

·         Partitive articles

 

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Theme 2:  Charities, voluntary work and healthy lifestyles

The speaking exam

Key Question

How can we use French to discuss healthy living and the roles of charities in society?

How can I best be prepared for the GCSE speaking exam?

Threshold Concepts

·         Conditional tense (vouloir and aimer)

·         En +present participle

·         Recognising the pluperfect tense

Raising the complexity of speaking responses with:

·         Range of tenses

·         Subordinating conjunctions

·         Justified opinions

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Modal verbs

·         Il faut + infinitive

·         Expressions of quantity

Preparation undertaken for Year 10 annual exam speaking exam.

·         Photo card and role-play

Assessment

Assessment 1: Term 1 (Reading, listening, vocabulary and grammar)

Assessment 2: Term 2: Annual exam (Speaking, listening, reading and writing)

       Assessment 3:Term 3: (Speaking)

 

Year 10 – Higher tier

Autumn Term, Half Term 1

Autumn Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Theme 1:  Technology in everyday life

Theme 1: Free-time activities

Key Question

What influence does technology have on everyday life?

How can French be used to talk about free-time and leisure interests?

Threshold Concepts

·         Using grâce à

·         Emphatic pronouns

Il est possible que + subjunctive

·         Demonstrative pronouns

·         Using subordinate clauses with quand, lorsque and si

·         The pronouns y and en

·         Using more complex negatives

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Present tense of regular-er, -ir, re verbs

·         Common irregular verbs

Pronunciation of verb endings

·         Perfect tense

·         Time phrases

·         Future tense

·         Emphatic pronouns

 

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Theme 1: Customs and festivals

Theme 2:  Home, town and region

Key Question

How can I talk about customs and traditions not only in the United Kingdom, but in French-speaking countries too?

How can French be used to talk about my home, town and region?

Threshold Concepts

·         Reflexive verbs in the perfect tense

·         The perfect infinitive

·         Rules of agreement with the perfect infinitive

·         Using en/au/aux/à + countries and towns

·         De following negative phrases

·         The conditional of irregular verbs

·         Possessive pronouns

·         Demonstrative adjectives

·         Prepositions of place

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Perfect tense

·         Imperfect tense

·         Using the perfect and imperfect tenses together

·         The conditional tense

·         Comparative and superlative adjectives

 

Summer Term, Half Term 1

Summer Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title

Theme 2:  Charities, voluntary work and healthy lifestyles

The speaking exam

Key Question

How can we use French to discuss healthy living and the roles of charities in society?

How can I best be prepared for the GCSE speaking exam?

Threshold Concepts

·         Vouloir que + subjunctive

·         Using il vaut / il vaudrait mieux to suggest change

·         En +present participle

·         Pluperfect tense

·         Subordinate clauses starting with ce que

Raising the complexity of speaking responses with:

·         Si clauses

·         Subordinating conjunctions

·         Subjunctive

·         More sophisticated connectives

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Expressions of quantity

·         The imperfect tense

·         Negative constructions

Preparation undertaken for Year 10 annual exam speaking exam.

·         Photo card and role-play

Assessment

Assessment 1: Term 1 (Reading, listening, vocabulary and grammar)

Assessment 2: Term 2: Annual exam (Speaking, listening, reading and writing)

       Assessment 3:Term 3: (Speaking)

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The content taught in year 10 prepares students for the AQA GCSE qualification which is divided into three main subject areas called Themes.  Year 10 students are taught the linguistic structures and vocabulary relating to Theme 1, Identity and culture, and part of Theme 2, Local, national, international and global areas of interest. The course follows a logical, coherent structure, consolidating and extending core knowledge taught in Key Stage 3, such as describing free-time activities in the past.  In addition, new, engaging material is taught, for instance, the impact of inequality and the role of charities in addressing current social issues. The vocabulary and structures taught both extend students’ knowledge of the language while at the same time clearly embedding content within the French cultural context. Students develop an understanding of the French education system, for example, and acquire a deeper appreciation of literary texts, a prerequisite for outstanding achievement in the reading component of GCSE.

The cultural visit to Paris brings the language to life in a way a classroom setting could never do.   It affords students a wonderful opportunity to immerse themselves in the French way of life while simultaneously improving their linguistic skills.

All grammatical concepts taught in Key Stage 3 are revisited in Year 10, allowing for effective retrieval practice and consolidation of knowledge in students’ long term memory.

In terms of new grammatical concepts, the Year 10 curriculum, not only links well with prior learning, but also provides a strong foundation for the next stage of study, adding an increasing degree of complexity to what is taught. Higher tier students, for example, build upon their knowledge of both the perfect and imperfect tenses, to study the pluperfect tense. Foundation tier students extend their knowledge of the perfect tense, learning to recognise and use reflexive verbs in the past.  The Year 10 curriculum is ambitious in terms of new vocabulary and grammar, thereby facilitating students’ ability to understand and apply their knowledge with an increasing degree of sophistication in speaking and writing.  It is essential that they are given ample opportunity to apply what is taught and acquire a strong sense of the practical nature of language learning.

Translation skills, introduced in Key Stage 3 are further developed, providing the means for pupils to manipulate language with an increasing degree of precision and accuracy.

 

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 10 French curriculum, please click here.

Year 8 German
Year 8 Autumn Term, Half Term 1 Autumn Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title My World and I Family and Pets
Key Question How do we introduce ourselves in German? How do we talk about our family and friends in German?
Threshold Concepts

·         Pronunciation of German

·         Conjugation of regular present tense verbs

·         Conjugation of the irregular verb sein (=to be)

·         Conjugation of the irregular verb haben (=to have)

·         The difference between du, ihr, Sie (=you)

·         Possessive pronouns (mein + dein).

·         Introduction to the nominative and accusative cases

·         Asking questions using wer, wie, was, wo and woher)

·         Formation of compound nouns

·         Plural forms of nouns

·         Introduction to the modal verb können

·         Introduction to ordinal and cardinal numbers

 

Link to Prior Knowledge N/A

·         Present tense verb conjugation

·         Present tense conjugation of the irregular verbs haben and sein

·         Question formation

 

     
  Spring Term, Half Term 1 Spring Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Free time School
Key Question How can we talk about our free time in German? How do we talk about school in German?
Threshold Concepts

·         Using gern to express likes and dislikes

·         Introduction to some irregular verbs in the 3rd person singular form

·         Word order changes when starting sentences with a time phrase

·         Talking about the future with the present tense and a future time phrase

 

·         Using weil to justify opinions

·         Possessive pronouns sein + ihr

·         The dative case

·         Preposition usage with in, an, auf, neben

·         How to use es gibt

·         The modal verb dürfen

·         Using man to mean people in general

Link to Prior Knowledge ·         Present tense verb conjugation

·         Word order when starting sentences with a time phrase

·         Possessive pronouns mein + dein

·         The German case system: nominative and accusative cases

·         The modal verb können

 

 

   
  Summer Term, Half Term 1 + 2
Unit Title Travel
Key Question How can we talk about travel in German?
Threshold Concepts

·         Negation with kein

·         Using ich möchte to express wishes

·         Using Sie to make polite requests

·         Future tense formation with werden

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Formation of compound nouns

·         Present tense verb conjugation

·         The difference between du, ihr, Sie (=you)

·         Using gern to express likes and dislikes

Assessment:

Assessment 1: [Term 1.2] Based on Modules 1 and 2 (Listening, Grammar, Writing).

Assessment 2: [Term 2.1] Based on Module 3 (Reading, Grammar, Writing).

Assessment 3: Annual exam (Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening)

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The Year 8 German curriculum is designed to be knowledge rich, providing a solid foundation in terms of core structures and vocabulary and acting as a springboard for sustained progress throughout Key Stage 3.

Knowledge is taught contextually, using a range of topics which stimulate students’ curiosity of the German speaking world, such as the school system, free time activities, and travel.  The topics taught are age appropriate, corresponding to the interests and lifestyles of young people in their first two years of secondary school.  The core grammatical structures taught are carefully sequenced to ensure students make progress in a coherent and logical manner.  Spaced retrieval practice enables students to recall material on a regular basis, allowing for key knowledge to be effectively embedded in their long-term memory.

Our curriculum assumes that students have not been taught German in primary school; students therefore begin the Year 8 course with several lessons on the pronunciation of German. A phonics-based approach at this early stage means that pronunciation does not become a barrier to receptive or productive communication throughout students’ Key Stage 3 and 4 language learning.

As students make progress through the curriculum and deepen their knowledge of core structures and vocabulary, they are provided with regular opportunities to apply their knowledge in speaking and writing, thus establishing a clear link between the theory and practice of language.   The vocabulary and structures taught provide students with the tools to understand spoken and written language from a variety of sources. Translation skills into and out of German are introduced early in Year 8; this is an effective way to focus attention upon the need for precision and accurate use of language.

 

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 8 German curriculum, please click here.

Year 9 German
Year 9 Autumn Term, Half Term 1 Autumn Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Holidays Media
Key Question How do we talk about holidays in different tenses in German? How can we talk about the different types of media that we use in our spare time?
Threshold Concepts

·         The imperfect tense forms of the verbs haben, geben and sein

·         Perfect tense formation with haben as auxiliary

·         Perfect tense formation with sein as auxiliary

·         Asking questions in the perfect tense

·         The modal verb wollen

·         Prepositions used with the dative case

·         Using the modal verb dürfen in the negative form

·         The modal verb sollen in the affirmative and negative

·         Using the adverbs lieber and am liebsten to express likes and dislikes

 

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         The word kein

·         Present tense verbs, including the irregular verbs haben and sein

·         Verb 2nd idea rule

·         Different ways of saying ‘you’: du, ihr, Sie

·         Question formation

·         The modal verbs können and dürfen

·         Cases: nominative, accusative, dative

·         Prepositions in, an, auf, neben, in

·         Using the adverb gern to express likes and dislikes

     
  Spring Term, Half Term 1 Spring Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Health and Fitness Trips
Key Question How can we talk about our health and fitness in German? How can we talk about a school trip?
Threshold Concepts

·         Using the verbs essen and trinken in the perfect tense

·         Using the preposition mit

·         Using the preposition mit with plural nouns, adding -n

·         Using the verb nehmen in the present and perfect tenses

·         The imperative

·         The modal verb müssen

·         Using separable verbs like fernsehen

·         Using reflexive verbs in the present tense

·         Asking for directions using the preposition zu + dative

·         Using the preposition vor + dative

·         Using adjectives before nouns

·         Conjugation of the irregular verb tragen in the present and perfect tenses

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Perfect tense formation

·         Present tense formation

·         Negative usage with kein

·         Modal verbs: dürfen, können, müssen, sollen, wollen

·         Present tense formation

·         The imperative

·         Question formation

·         The case system: nominative, accusative, dative

·         Saying ‘you’: du, ihr, Sie

·         Irregular verbs from module 3, Year 8

     
  Summer Term, Half Term 1 Summer Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Planning to go out Free-time activities
Key Question How can we use German to plan a date? How can we talk about our free time in more detail in German?
Threshold Concepts

·         Using the word wenn with correct word order

·         Time-Manner-Place word order rule

·         Asking questions in the present, past and future tenses

·         The difference between mögen and gern when expressing likes and dislikes

·         Separable verb usage in the present, perfect and future tenses

·         Reflexive verb usage in the present, perfect and future tenses

·         Comparative and superlative adjectives

·         Saying ‘when’ using: wenn, wann, als

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Using adjectives before nouns

·         Using the word weil

·         Future tense formation, using werden

·         Separable and reflexive verbs

·         Question formation

·         Perfect tense formation

·         Imperfect tense of the verbs haben and sein

·         Using gern

·         Using ich möchte

·         Verb 2nd idea rule

·         Present tense verb conjugation, including haben + sein

·         Modal verbs

·         Perfect tense formation

·         Using the adverbs lieber and am liebsten to express likes and dislikes

·         Using weil

·         Time-Manner-Place adverb position

·         Separable verb usage in the present and perfect tenses

·         Reflexive verb usage in the present and perfect tenses

·         Future tense formation

·         Subordinating conjunctions: wenn, weil

Assessment:

Assessment 1: [Term 1.1] Based on Module 1 (Reading, Grammar, Writing).

Assessment 2: [Term 2.1] Based on Modules 2+ 3  (Listening, Grammar, Writing).

Assessment 3: Annual exam (Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening)

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The content taught in Year 9 has been selected to extend students’ knowledge of the language in contexts which are relevant to the emerging interests of students, e.g. media, health and fitness and arranging a first date.

Knowledge is carefully and sequentially built upon the Year 8 curriculum.  For example, Year 8 students learn language to express basic opinions regarding free time activities and this is consolidated and extended in Year 9 where students learn how to express more sophisticated ideas and opinions regarding the types of media that they use daily. New concepts such as the perfect tense develop coherently from Year 7 students’ introduction to present verbs and infinitives.

The Year 9 curriculum is structured in such a way to link well with prior learning and prepare pupils for Key Stage 4 study, adding an increasing degree of complexity in what is taught.  Students progress from using a single time frame in isolation, to manipulating verbs and vocabulary across three time frames, which is essential for making effective progress at GCSE. The introduction to an increased number of modal verbs and subordinating conjunctions, for instance, allows students to add a further degree of complexity to their own work, expressing more complex ideas.

Knowledge and skills are inextricably linked, and the Year 9 curriculum is therefore designed to facilitate students’ ability to apply their knowledge with an increasing degree of sophistication in speaking and writing. The vocabulary and structures taught also provide students with the tools to understand and respond to both spoken and written language. Translation skills introduced in Year 8 are strengthened in Year 9, providing the means for pupils to manipulate language with an increasing degree of precision and accuracy.

Following the annual examination, students who wish to study GCSE German follow a grammar-rich curriculum within the context of free-time activities. This not only allows students to consolidate their grammatical knowledge, but it also introduces some more complex grammatical structures which would usually be introduced in Year 3 of a 3-year Key Stage 3 curriculum. This sets students up for rapid progress as they enter Year 10.

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 9 German curriculum, please click here.

Year 10 German
Year 10 Autumn Term, Half Term 1 Autumn Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Me, my family and friends Technology in everyday life
Key Question How do I talk about myself, my friends and my family now, in the past and in the future? What influence does technology have on everyday life?
Threshold Concepts

·         Using regular and irregular verbs in the present tense

·         Using reflexive verbs

·         Using the future tense

·         Using comparative and superlative adjectives

·         Using direct and indirect object pronouns

·         Using wenn, wann, als to say ‘when’

·         Using the imperfect tense

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Present tense verb conjugation

·         Using adjectives before and after nouns

·         The German case system: nominative, accusative, dative

·         Word order after subordinating conjunctions

     
 

Spring Term, Half Term 1

Spring Term, Half Term 2

Unit Title Customs and festivals
Key Question How can I talk about customs and traditions not only in the United Kingdom, but in German-speaking countries?
Threshold Concepts

·         Using adjectives as nouns

·         Verb 2nd idea rule

·         Using the perfect tense

·         Using direct object pronouns

·         Using indirect object pronouns

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Capitalisation of German nouns

·         Gender

·         Adjectival endings

·         Present tense conjugations of haben and sein

     
  Summer Term, Half Term 1 Summer Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Home, town, neighbourhood and region Social issues
Key Question How can I discuss my local area? How can I discuss social issues, such as poverty and homelessness effectively?
Threshold Concepts

·         Using dual case prepositions

·         Using prepositions which are followed by the dative case

·         Using können

·         Question formation with interrogatives

·         Using in with the accusative or dative case

·         Using wenn clauses

·         Forming the conditional using würde

·         Irregular forms of the conditional including wäre, hätte, gäbe

·         Using als for ‘when’ when talking about the past

·         The difference between müssen and dürfen in the negative

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         The case system: nominative, accusative, dative

·         Modal verb rules

·         Question formation

·         The case system: nominative, accusative, dative

·         Rules for using subordinating conjunctions

·         Future tense

·         Imperfect tense

·         Modal verbs

Assessment:

Assessment 1: [Term 1.1] Based on Module 1 (Grammar)

Assessment 2: [Term 1.2] Based on Modules 1 + 3  (Listening, Reading, Writing)

Assessment 3: Annual exam (Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening)

Assessment 4: Trial speaking exam

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

Students who opt to study German in Key Stage 4 follow the AQA GCSE specification, which is divided into 3 Themes. This is covered over two years. In Year 10, students are taught the linguistic structures and vocabulary relating to Theme 1: Identity and culture, and the first half of Theme 2: Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

The Year 10 course follows a logical, coherent structure. Whilst some topics – such as family and media – covered in Year 10 will be familiar to students from Key Stage 3, new and engaging topics are also introduced, such as customs and traditions in German-speaking countries. Students are also introduced to several literary texts during the Year 10 course. These new topics help capture and maintain students’ interest, reflecting their emotional, social and intellectual development since Key Stage 3.

Throughout the Year 10 course, new language and grammatical structures are taught contextually. Lexically, the Year 10 curriculum is ambitious in its introduction of new vocabulary, and as such, students are given regular opportunities to review previously learned vocabulary both at home and in the classroom to maximise long-term retention. Grammatically, the Year 10 course aims to consolidate and extend core grammatical knowledge taught at Key Stage 3. All grammatical concepts taught in Key Stage 3 are revisited throughout Year 10, allowing for effective retrieval practice and consolidation. This embeds this essential grammar in students’ long-term memory. Newly introduced grammatical concepts not only link to prior learning, but also provide a strong foundation for Advanced-level study by adding an increasing degree of complexity to what is taught. Students are taught, for instance, not only how to use the German equivalent of the conditional tense but are pushed even further to use this in subordinate clauses. By systematically reviewing and introducing new vocabulary and grammatical structures, students are able to understand and manipulate language in an increasingly sophisticated way – both orally and in written form, building upon the skills developed at Key Stage 3.

The cultural visit to Cologne brings the language to life in a way a classroom setting could never do. It affords students an opportunity to immerse themselves in the German way of life while simultaneously improving their linguistic skills.

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 10 German curriculum, please click here.

Year 11 German
Year 11 Autumn Term, Half Term 1 Autumn Term, Half Term 2
Unit Title Global issues Travel and Tourism
Key Question How do I talk about a range of global issues, such as the environment, in German? How do I talk about holidays that I have been on in German?
Threshold Concepts

·         Using the imperative

·         Using the pluperfect tense

·         Using accusative and dative reflexive pronouns

·         Using reflexive verbs with a direct object

·         Recognising the imperfect tense of irregular verbs

·         Using coordinating and subordinating conjunctions

·         Choosing dative or accusative after prepositions

·         Using relative pronouns and was

Link to Prior Knowledge

·         Differences between du, ihr, Sie when saying ‘you’

·         Formation of the perfect tense

·         Formation of the imperfect tense

·         Formation of the imperfect tense of the verbs haben, sein, geben and modal verbs

·         Word order rules after subordinating conjunctions

·         Gender

·         The German case system: nominative, accusative, dative

     
Unit Title

My studies

Life at school/college

Education post-16

Jobs, career choices and ambitions

Key Question How do I talk about school? How do I talk about my future plans post-16?
Threshold Concepts

·         Using the prepositions seit and vor

·         Using the correct tense with seit

·         Using infinitive constructions

·         Using the subjunctive of common verbs

·         Using welcher to mean ‘which?’

·         Using verbs followed by zu

·         Using a range of subordinating conjunctions

·         Using the genitive case

Link to Prior Knowledge ·         Cases used after prepositions

·         Gender

·         The German case system: nominative, accusative, dative

·         Rules for using subordinating conjunctions

Assessment:

Assessment 1: Annual exam (Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening)

Assessment 2: [Term 2.2] Past exam papers (Listening, Reading, Writing)

Assessment 3: [Term 3.1 + 3.2] External examinations

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

In Year 11, students continue to extend their knowledge and understanding across the three GCSE Themes, with a focus upon the structures and vocabulary relating to global issues, travel and tourism, education and employment. New content continues to be introduced in a rich cultural context allowing students to broaden their horizons and appreciate customs and traditions other than their own. Students develop an understanding of the German education system, for example, and evaluate strengths and weaknesses in relation to the UK. The cultural insight which the course offers continues to be complemented by a study of literary texts.

As in Year 10, students are keenly aware of their increased confidence with the application of their knowledge in the skills of speaking and writing, developing both fluency and spontaneity. Pupils are also exposed to more challenging texts and passages, developing their ability to read and listen for both gist and detail.

Whilst there is rightly an emphasis upon exam practice and preparation, the course follows a coherent structure, consolidating and building upon the knowledge taught in Year 10. Students benefit from regular retrieval practice with respect to the core time frames, whilst also extending their knowledge of new grammatical concepts such as the use of the pluperfect tense. Translation skills continue to be developed, providing the means for pupils to manipulate language with an increasing degree of confidence and accuracy.

The themes and structures taught are sequenced in such a way to provide a springboard for study at a more advanced level in sixth form. Discussing poverty and inequality, for example, enables students to develop and justify their ideas with increasingly more sophisticated language.

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 11 German curriculum, please click here.

Year 8 Latin
Year 8 Mixed Ability Autumn Term: Half Term 1 Autumn Term: Half Term 2
Unit Title and Description

Caecilius and Pompeii

Learning the foundations of Latin grammar while being introduced to the lives of people in the town of Pompeii (1st century CE)

Business and leisure in Pompeii

Learning increasingly complex grammar including plural forms

Key Question What was life like for the wealthy in Pompeii? What economies thrived in Pompeii? How did people spend their leisure time?
Threshold Concepts

·         Nouns in three declensions

·         Nominative and accusative cases

·         Latin word order

·         Adjectives

·         The archaeological evidence for life in Pompeii

·         A typical Italic house

 

·         Plural forms: nouns and verbs

·         !st and 2nd person verb endings

·         Pronouns

·         The importance of the forum

·         The theatre: a typical Plautus plot

Link to prior knowledge Not applicable

·         Accidence in Latin

·         Basic syntax

·         The geography of Pompeii

     
  Spring Term: Half Term 1 Spring Term: Half Term 2
Unit Title and Description

Slavery and Death

Looking at two new past tenses: the imperfect and the perfect while also learning about the lives of the slaves in society and also the Romans’ beliefs about life after death.

Gladiators and Bathing

Learning a new case- the dative- in nouns and pronouns while also learning about two key areas of leisure for the people of Pompeii: the amphitheatre and the baths

Key Question What evidence is there in Pompeii about the treatment of slaves? What did the Romans believe concerning life after death?

What experience was on offer at an amphitheatre?

Who went to the baths and why?

Threshold Concepts

·         The imperfect and perfect tenses

·         Sentences with no clear subject

·         Verbs that form their perfect stem without a ‘v’

·         The work and treatment of slaves

·         Manumission

·         Freedmen

·         Tombs

·         Ghost stories

·         Nouns in the accusative plural

·         Superlative adjectives

·         The dative case in both nouns and pronouns

·         Gladiatorial shows: types of gladiator

·         The structure of the amphitheatre

·         The importance of the  baths in Pompeii

Link to prior knowledge

·         Verbs in Latin: present tense

·         The role of the subject and object

·         The structure of society

 

·         Recognition of pronouns

·         Cases in Latin

·         Adjectives: positive

·         Slaves as gladiators

·         Public buildings in Pompeii

     
  Summer Term: Half Term 1 Summer Term: Half Term 2
Unit title

Education and Elections

Reviewing all of the endings of the present tense while looking at the education system in Pompeii.

Vesuvius

Learning the last two parts of the imperfect and perfect tenses while looking at the catastrophic impact of the eruption of Vesuvius in 79CE.

Key Question How were children in Pompeii educated? How were elections managed?

How did the eruption of Vesuvius in 79CE impact Pompeii?

What were the phases of rediscovery and excavation?

Threshold Concepts

·         The present tense: all endings

·         The comparative form of the adjective

·         Verbs taking the dative case

·         The three stages of education

·         The education of girls

·         Local government

·         Revision of all present, imperfect and perfect tense endings

·         The verb ‘to be’

·         Revision of nominative, accusative and dative endings in three declensions

Link to prior concepts

·         Verb endings

·         Adjectives: positive and superlative

·         The structure of Pompeian society

·         Daily life

·         Verb endings

·         Nouns in three cases

·         The use of each case

Assessment

·         Vocabulary tests at the start of each stage

·         Stage Review tests at the end of each stage

·         Cambridge Latin Course Attainment Tests on completion of Stages 4, 8 and 12

 

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The content taught in year 8 has been selected to introduce students to the basic concepts of Latin grammar while also offering them an insight into life in 1st century Pompeii, a wealthy and cosmopolitan trading city.

Students will have had two introductory language lessons and one introductory culture lesson in Year 7, although most students will probably have some additional knowledge of Roman life from their studies at Key Stage 2 and their own reading.

Initially, the students are encouraged to work out new grammatical concepts for themselves. This leads on to a thorough explanation followed by practice exercises.

Links are made between Latin words and their derivatives in English, French and Spanish.

All concepts learned in each stage are thoroughly tested using the Stage Review tests which use the format of GCSE literature papers. In this way, students familiarise themselves with the requirements of the GCSE exams while also ensuring that they have an excellent knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary learned in each stage before moving on to more complex material.

The cultural aspect of the course is taught in a way designed to make the students think about the similarities and differences between our society’s values and those of the Romans. There are tasks set to allow students to use their creative skills to explore each topic in depth and with enjoyment.

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 8 Latin curriculum, please click here.

Year 9 Latin
Year 9 Mixed Ability Autumn Term: Half Term 1 Autumn Term: Half Term 2
Unit Title and Description

Life in Rural Britannia

Learning more complex grammar including modal verbs: volo, nolo and possum that take the infinitive while learning about the lives of slaves on a villa estate with different skills.

King Cogidubnus: a client king

Learning about main and subordinate clauses specifically the relative clause while finding out about the life of a tribal ruler who welcomed the Roman invasion and benefited from it.

Key Question How did farming change during the early years of the Roman occupation? What did it mean to be a client king? Why was Fishbourne palace built?
Threshold Concepts

·         Modal verbs: volo, nolo and possum

·         Infinitives and their uses

·         Key connectives

·         Agreement of adjectives across the declensions

·         The archaeological evidence for life in rural Britain

·         British tribes

·         The Boudiccan Revolt

 

·         Relative clauses

·         Relative pronouns in three genders

·         The imperfect tense of the irregular verb possum

·         The pluperfect tense

Link to prior knowledge

·         Adjective forms: positive, comparative and superlative

·         Nouns in three cases

·         Roman houses

·         Slavery in the Roman empire

·         The perfect stem

·         The imperfect of the verb ‘to be’

·         Tribes and chieftains in Roman Britain

·         Tribal districts

     
  Spring Term: Half Term 1 Spring Term: Half Term 2
Unit Title and Description

Alexandria

Learning a new case and how it is used while focusing on the city of Alexandria – its foundation and layout.

Glassmaking and peasant life in Roman Egypt

Focusing on adjectives while also learning about a key industry in Alexandria: glassmaking

Key Question

What evidence is there for the establishment of Alexandria under Alexander of Macedon?

How does underwater archaeology improve our understanding of Alexandria?

How was glass made in Alexandria? How important was this industry? What role did cats play in the Egyptian belief system?

How important was the River Nile for the economy in Roman Egypt?

Threshold Concepts

·         The genitive case

·         Revision of the nominative, accusative and dative case

·         Alexander of Macedon

·         Alexandria as a trading port

·         The Caesareum

·         Underwater archaeology

·         Adjectives across all three grammatical genders

·         Glassmaking in Alexandria: process and economy

·         The structure of society in Alexandria

·         Evidence for corruption in the administration of Roman Egypt

Link to prior knowledge

·         The cases in Latin

·         Roman provincial administration

 

·         Adjectives: singular and plural forms

·         Alexandrian industry

 

     
  Summer Term: Half Term 1 Summer Term: Half Term 2
Unit title and Description

The worship of the goddess Isis

Looking at the adjectives hic and ille while also studying the worship of the goddess of rebirth: Isis

Medicine and science in Alexandria

Learning a new grammatical form: the present participle while also learning about the importance of Alexandria as a place of learning.

Key Question

How significant was the worship of Isis for Alexandria in its role as a trading port?

 

How significant was Alexandria as a seat of learning for the sciences?

What discoveries were made in Alexandria?

Threshold Concepts

·         Demonstrative adjectives: ‘hic’ and ‘ille’

·         Imperatives: form and use

·         The vocative case in Latin

·         Present participles: their form and translation

·         Personal pronouns in five cases

Link to prior concepts

·         Adjective forms

·         Adjectival agreement

·         The case system in Latin

·         Religious observance

·         Cases in Latin: nominative, vocative, accusative, genitive and dative

·         The library of Alexandria

Assessment

·         Vocabulary tests at the start of each stage

·         Stage Review tests at the end of each stage

·         Cambridge Latin Course Attainment Tests on completion of Stages 16 and 20

 

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The content taught in year 9 has been selected to introduce students to the more complex concepts of Latin grammar while also offering them an insight into life in 1st century Britain and also Alexandria a wealthy and cosmopolitan trading city.

Students will have completed Cambridge Latin Course Book 1 where they will have studied three tenses and three cases. They will also have learned about life in a busy trading port in Campania.

Initially, the students are encouraged to work out new grammatical concepts for themselves. This leads on to a thorough explanation followed by practice exercises.

Links are made between Latin words and their derivatives in English, French and Spanish.

All concepts learned in each stage are thoroughly tested using the Stage Review tests which use the format of GCSE literature papers. In this way, students familiarise themselves with the requirements of the GCSE exams while also ensuring that they have an excellent knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary learned in each stage before moving on to more complex material.

The cultural aspect of the course is taught in a way designed to make the students think about the similarities and differences between our society’s values and those of the Romans. There are tasks set to allow students to use their creative skills to explore each topic in depth and with enjoyment.

Students are encouraged to explore the topics in the excursus sections in greater depth by watching documentaries, studying the art Romano-British Egyptian cultures, and also reading articles in approved journals.

 

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 9 Latin curriculum, please click here.

Year 10 Latin
Year 10 Mixed Ability Autumn Term: Half Term 1 Autumn Term: Half Term 2
Unit Title and Description

Aquae Sulis

Learning more complex grammar including perfect participles: active and passive while learning about the lives of people in the town of Bath (Aquae Sulis) and its importance as a centre of healing.

Roman Religion

Learning about neuter nouns and connections between verbs and nouns while finding out about the processes of religious observance including the role of the haruspex in divination.

Key Question Why did the Romans build a temple complex in the town of Aquae Sulis? How did the Romans further the cause of ‘romanitas’ using religion?
Threshold Concepts

·         Review of present participles

·         Understanding the formation and usage of PPPs and PAPs

·         The partitive genitive

·         The baths and temple complex at Aquae Sulis circa 100CE

·         Magic and curses: the famous lead tablets: ‘defixiones’

 

·         Review of participles

·         The plural of neuter nouns

·         Word patterns: links between nouns and associated verbs

·         Sacrifice

·         Divination

·         Religion and ‘romanitas’: conflation of deities

·         Worship of the Emperor

Link to prior knowledge

·         The concept of participles: a verbal adjective

·         The genitive case

·         Roman bathing (Stage 9 CLC Book 1)

·         Roman Religion (Stage 7 CLC Book 1 and Stage 19 Book 2)

·         Noun endings

·         Roman religion (Stage 7 CLC Book 1, Stage 19 CLC Book 2 and Stage 21 CLC Book 3)

·         Promotion of the Roman way of life: Book 2

     
  Spring Term: Half Term 1 Spring Term: Half Term 2
Unit Title and Description

Military Life in Roman Britain

Introducing the subjunctive mood with two common uses while finding out about the life of ordinary soldiers stationed in Britain during the Roman occupation.

The Organisation of the Army

Furthering knowledge of the uses of the subjunctive by looking at purpose and result clauses while considering the role of the senior officers in the army.

Key Question What does the archaeological evidence tells us about the lives of soldiers stationed in Britain during the Roman occupation?

How was the army arranged? Who were the senior officers in the army?

 

Threshold Concepts

·         Two forms of the subjunctive: the imperfect and the pluperfect

·         The temporal clause

·         The indirect question

·         The development of the road system in Roman Britain

·         The legionary soldier: recruitment, pay, conditions

·         Further uses of the subjunctive: the purpose clause and the result clause

·         An introduction to gerundives expressing necessity

·         The senior officers and their role in the army

·         The legionary fortress

·         inscriptions

Link to prior knowledge

·         The present active infinitive (used as the imperfect subjunctive stem)

·         Direct question

·         Question words

·         The invasion of Britain

 

·         The imperfect and pluperfect subjunctives

·         The organisation of the army

     
  Summer Term: Half Term 1 Summer Term: Half Term 2
Unit title and Description

Archaeology of Roman Britain

Learning the final case in Latin: the ablative and its uses while learning about a key figure in the history of the Roman occupation through the writings of his son-in-law, Tacitus.

The City of Rome

Learning passive forms in different tenses while looking at the layout of the city of Rome with a particular focus on the Forum Romanum.

Key Question

What types of archaeological evidence are there in Britain? What can we learn about life in Roman Britain by studying the archaeological evidence?

 

How important was the Roman Forum in Rome?

How were major building projects carried out and funded? What objection was there to Roman rule in Judaea?

Threshold Concepts

·         The ablative case

·         Expressions of time using the ablative and the accusative cases

·         The historian Tacitus and Agricola

·         Archaeological evidence

·         Passive verbs in the 3rd person present and imperfect

·         Purpose clauses using ‘ubi and ‘qui’

·         Perfect and pluperfect passive verbs

·         The Roman Forum

·         Conflict: The Jewish Rebellion: Titus and Vespasian

Link to prior concepts

·         Cases in Latin and their uses

·          The army in Britain

·         The active forms of the verb

·         The meaning of passive linked to PPPs

·         The subjunctive and its uses

·         The forum of Pompeii (Book1 CLC)

Assessemnt

·         Vocabulary tests at the start of each stage

·         Stage Review tests at the end of each stage

·         Cambridge Latin Course Attainment Tests on completion of Stages 24 and 28

 

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The content taught in year 9 has been selected to introduce students to the more complex concepts of Latin grammar while also offering them an insight into life in the army in 1st century Roman Britain.

Students will have completed Cambridge Latin Course Books 1 and 2 where they will have studied three tenses and five cases. They will also have learned about life on a villa estate in Noviomagus (Chichester) and an important centre of healing in the south west (Bath).

Initially, the students are encouraged to work out new grammatical concepts for themselves. This leads on to a thorough explanation followed by practice exercises.

Links are made between Latin words and their derivatives in English, French and Spanish.

All concepts learned in each stage are thoroughly tested using the Stage Review tests which use the format of GCSE literature papers. In this way, students familiarise themselves with the requirements of the GCSE exams while also ensuring that they have an excellent knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary learned in each stage before moving on to more complex material.

The cultural aspect of the course is taught in a way designed to make the students think about the similarities and differences between our society’s values and those of the Romans. There are tasks set to allow students to use their creative skills to explore each topic in depth and with enjoyment.

Students are encouraged to explore in greater depth the topics introduced in the excursus sections by watching documentaries, studying the weapons and armour of different sorts of Roman soldiers and also reading articles in approved journals.

 

 If you would like more in depth information about the Year 10 Latin curriculum, please click here.

Year 11 Latin
Year 11 Mixed Ability Autumn Term: Half Term 1 Autumn Term: Half Term 2
Unit Title and Description

Patrons and Clients in Rome

Learning more complex grammar including the ablative absolute, deponent verbs and future active participles while learning about the public buildings in Rome including the Colosseum and the Circus Maximus, and the system of patronage in the city.

Learning about the historical context and the content of the GCSE prose set text texts in English.

Entertainment and Leisure in Ancient Rome

Learning the future tense both active and passive.

Studying the GCSE prose set texts in Latin.

Learning key technical terms for literary criticism of Latin texts.

Different forms of education available in 1st century CE Rome.

 

Key Question How important was it for people to live in Rome if they wished to live a successful public life?  Example: ‘Tacitus’ account is unconvincing as his good characters are too good while his bad characters are too bad.’ How far do you agree with this statement?
Threshold Concepts

·         The ablative absolute: how to recognise and translate this feature of grammar.

·         Deponent verbs and how to translate them

·         Future active participles

·         Entertainment in Rome

·         Astrology, philosophy and other beliefs

·         Introduction to the GCSE prose set texts: understanding the narrative

·         The future tense: active and passive

·         The future perfect tense and its uses

·         Compound verbs: common prefixes

·         GCSE prose set text in Latin

·         Understanding and employing the Greek terms commonly used in Latin literary criticism

·         Preparing for the synoptic question

Link to prior knowledge

·         The ablative case

·         The use of participles

·         Passive forms

·         The theatres and amphitheatre in Pompeii (Book 1 CLC)

·         Religion in the ancient world Books 1, 2 and 3 CLC)

 

·         The tenses in Latin

·         Participles

·         GCSE prose set text in English

   

 

 

  Spring Term: Half Term 1 Spring Term: Half Term 2
Unit Title and Description

Country Life and Recitations

Learning increasingly complex structures including the indirect statement while looking at the country retreats of two prominent Romans: Hadrian and Pliny.

 

The Emperor’s Council

Furthering knowledge of indirect statement introducing new infinitive forms while considering the role of the emperor’s chief advisers in the administration of the Empire.

Key Question Why did wealthy Romans buy country villas? Why might someone attend a recitation?

Who were the ‘amici Principis’? How influential were they?

 

Threshold Concepts

·         Passive and deponent verbs

·         Indirect statement constructions: accusative + infinitive

·         Present subjunctive

·         The country life

·         Hadrian’s villa

·         Recitations

·         Introduction to the verse set text in English

·         Literary and historical context of Virgil’s Aeneid

·         Indirect statement using the perfect active, perfect passive and future active infinitives

·         The perfect subjunctive

·         GCSE Verse set text in Latin

·         Understanding the role of scansion in understanding poetry

·         Preparing for the synoptic question

Link to prior knowledge

·         Subjunctive forms

·         The present indicative

·         Life in a villa in Roman Britain (CLC Book 2)

·         The poetry of Martial

·         Indirect statement using the present infinitive

·         The future perfect tense

·         GCSE verse set text in English

     
  Summer Term: Half Term 1 Summer Term: Half Term 2
Unit title and Description

Domitian and the law courts

Revising the accidence and syntax required for the GCSE language paper. Completing revision materials to prepare for the GCSE prose and verse set texts while also looking at law and order during the reign of Domitian.

Exam practice

Using the resources available online, completing language papers in timed conditions and receiving feedback.

 

Key Question

Example: How does Pliny keep his readers entertained?

What do we learn of Virgil’s attitude to war by reading Book 11 of the Aeneid?

Example: OCR Latin GCSE Language papers 2016 onwards
Threshold Concepts

·         Passive and deponent verbs

·         Word order in poetry

·         Scansion

·         Gerunds and gerundives

·         Indirect statement concluded

·         GCSE specified vocabulary list

·         All accidence and syntax required for GCSE

·         GCSE prose and verse set texts

Link to prior concepts

·         All language work from the start of the CLC

·         Set text preparation from the start of Year 11

·         Preparation for GCSE set texts

·         Language work completed since the start of the course

Assessment

·         Vocabulary tests at the start of each stage

·         Stage Review tests at the end of each stage

·         Cambridge Latin Course Attainment Tests on completion of Stages 35 and 40

·         GCSE Language papers are used as weekly preparation

·         GCSE style prose and verse set text tests provided in timed conditions with feedback.

 

Knowledge and sequencing rationale

The content taught in year 11 has been selected to introduce students to the last elements of accidence and syntax needed for the GCSE exam while also covering all of the material specified for the GCSE prose and verse set text exams.

Students will have completed Cambridge Latin Course Books 1 to 4 where they will have studied most of the grammar required. They will also have learned a wealth of information about life in Roman times covering a number of study areas relevant to their GCSE exams.

The students are introduced to their set texts in English first to give them an appreciation of the historical and literary context before attempting to work on the Latin.

All concepts learned in the final stages of the CLC course are thoroughly tested using the Stage Review tests which use the format of GCSE literature papers. In this way, students familiarise themselves with the requirements of the GCSE exams while also ensuring that they have an excellent knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary learned in each stage before moving on to more complex material.

The cultural aspect of the course is taught in a way designed to make the students think about the similarities and differences between our society’s values and those of the Romans. There are tasks set to allow students to use their creative skills to explore each topic in depth and with enjoyment.

Students are encouraged to explore in greater depth the topics introduced in their set texts by reading approved articles and watching relevant documentaries.

If you would like more in depth information about the Year 11 Latin curriculum, please click here.

Sixth Form

French and German
Key Stage 5

Latin
Key Stage 5

Languages Staff